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Open AccessArticle

Smart Software Can Increase Sit–Stand Desk Transitions During Active Computer Use

1
Department of Environmental & Occupational Health, Texas A&M University School of Public Health, College Station, TX 77843, USA
2
Department of Biostatistics & Epidemiology, Texas A&M University School of Public Health, College Station, TX 77843, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(13), 2438; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16132438
Received: 31 May 2019 / Revised: 27 June 2019 / Accepted: 3 July 2019 / Published: 9 July 2019
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Abstract

The objective use of table top adjustable sit–stand desks has yet to be determined, due to the lack of an effective digital evaluation method. The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of computer prompt software on table top sit–stand desks to determine if there was a difference in the frequency of desk position changes. This five month, pre-post pilot study on 47 university staff members used a novel USB accelerometer sensor and computer software reminders to continuously record and prompt increases in desk usage to promote physical activity at the workstation. During the baseline phase (3 months), desk usage data were continuously recorded for all workers. Following the baseline, the results from a two-month intervention of personalized computer reminders doubled the number of desk position changes per work day from 1 desk position change every 2 work days to 1 change every work day. Furthermore, those who changed desk positions once or twice a day increased from 4% to 36% from baseline to intervention. Overall, the intervention was encouraging, but longer intervention studies are warranted to determine if the desk usage behavior change can be improved and sustained for years and whether that change results in health gains. View Full-Text
Keywords: software; office physical activity; sedentary behavior software; office physical activity; sedentary behavior
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Sharma, P.; Pickens, A.; Mehta, R.; Han, G.; Benden, M.E. Smart Software Can Increase Sit–Stand Desk Transitions During Active Computer Use. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 2438.

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