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Article

Environmental and Motivational Determinants of Physical Activity among Canadian Inuit in the Arctic

1
Department of Health Promotion, Maastricht University, NUTRIM School of Nutrition and Translational Research in Metabolism, Maastricht University Medical Center+, P.O. Box 616, 6200 MD Maastricht, The Netherlands
2
Department of Work & Social Psychology, Faculty of Psychology & Neuroscience, Maastricht University, Universiteitssingel 40, 6200 MD Maastricht, The Netherlands
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(13), 2437; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16132437
Received: 28 April 2019 / Revised: 1 July 2019 / Accepted: 4 July 2019 / Published: 9 July 2019
Background: Canadian Inuit have transited from a physically active hunter-gatherer subsistence lifestyle into sedentary ways of life. The purpose of the current study was to measure physical activity levels among Nunavut Inuit adults, and explore the socio-cognitive and environmental factors influencing the number of steps taken per day. Method: Inuit and non-Inuit adults (N = 272) in Nunavut participated in a seven-day pedometer study during summer and winter seasons. Participants were asked to complete the Neighbourhood Environmental Walkability Scale (NEWS) and Behavioral Regulation in Exercise Questionnaire (BREQ-3). Data analyses included descriptive statistics, hierarchical linear regression, and tests of mediation effects. Results: Participants had limited to low activity at a rate of 5027 ± 1799 and 4186 ± 1446 steps per day, during summer and winter, respectively. There were no seasonal and age effects on the number of steps. Gender effects and community differences were observed. Perceived infrastructure and safety as well as land use mix diversity were found to be positive environmental correlates of steps taken, which were partially mediated by identified motivational regulation. Conclusion: Physical activity levels among Nunavut adults are generally low, but can be promoted by improving the external physical environment and internal motivational regulation. View Full-Text
Keywords: Arctic; Inuit; environment; active; steps; pedometer; determinants; regulation; and promotion Arctic; Inuit; environment; active; steps; pedometer; determinants; regulation; and promotion
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MDPI and ACS Style

Akande, V.O.; Ruiter, R.A.C.; Kremers, S.P.J. Environmental and Motivational Determinants of Physical Activity among Canadian Inuit in the Arctic. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 2437. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16132437

AMA Style

Akande VO, Ruiter RAC, Kremers SPJ. Environmental and Motivational Determinants of Physical Activity among Canadian Inuit in the Arctic. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2019; 16(13):2437. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16132437

Chicago/Turabian Style

Akande, Victor O., Robert A.C. Ruiter, and Stef P.J. Kremers. 2019. "Environmental and Motivational Determinants of Physical Activity among Canadian Inuit in the Arctic" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 16, no. 13: 2437. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16132437

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