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“Why Can’t I Become a Manager?”—A Systematic Review of Gender Stereotypes and Organizational Discrimination

Department of Psychology, Universidad de Oviedo, 33003 Oviedo, Spain
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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(10), 1813; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16101813
Received: 5 April 2019 / Revised: 17 May 2019 / Accepted: 18 May 2019 / Published: 22 May 2019
Women continue to lag behind for accessing managerial positions, partially due to discrimination at work. One of the main roots of such discrimination is gender stereotyping, so we aim to comprehend those biased procedures. First, we have analyzed those highlighted gender lawsuit cases in the scientific literature that have dealt with stereotypes both in the American and the European work contexts. Second, meta-analytic studies regarding organizational consequences of gender stereotypes have been synthetized. Third, gender stereotypes have been grouped by means of a content analysis of the existing literature after processing 61 articles systematically retrieved from WOS, SCOPUS, and PsycINFO databases. As a result, a taxonomy of gender stereotypes has been achieved evidencing that descriptive and prescriptive stereotypes have an impact on decision-making procedures through the apparently perception of women as less suitable for managerial positions. Moreover, we offer a deep explanation of the gender discrimination phenomenon under the umbrella of psychosocial theories, and some measures for successfully overcoming management stereotyping, showing that organizational culture can be improved from both the perspective of equal employment opportunities and the organizational justice frameworks for reaching a balanced and healthier workplace. View Full-Text
Keywords: gender discrimination; stereotypes; managerial positions; organizational justice; systematic review; decent work; equal employment opportunities; healthy organizations gender discrimination; stereotypes; managerial positions; organizational justice; systematic review; decent work; equal employment opportunities; healthy organizations
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Castaño, A.M.; Fontanil, Y.; García-Izquierdo, A.L. “Why Can’t I Become a Manager?”—A Systematic Review of Gender Stereotypes and Organizational Discrimination. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 1813.

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