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Partnering with the Health Professions to Promote Prevention of an Alcohol-Exposed Pregnancy: Lessons Learned from an Academic–Organizational Collaborative

1
School of Social Work, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211, USA
2
Center for Behavioral health Research and Services, University of Alaska Anchorage, Anchorage, AK 99508, USA
3
Center for Interprofessional Practice, Education and Research, Creighton University, Omaha, NE 68178, USA
4
Department of Family and Community Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77098, USA
5
School of Nursing, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261, USA
6
Center for the Application of Substance Abuse Technologies (CASAT), University of Nevada, Reno, NV 89557, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(10), 1702; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16101702
Received: 12 April 2019 / Revised: 3 May 2019 / Accepted: 10 May 2019 / Published: 15 May 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD))
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Abstract

Background: Evidence-based strategies exist to train healthcare professionals to ask their patients and clients about alcohol use, and are successful. Implementation of these strategies utilizing a system-level approach has not been conducted nationwide. This case study reports on the success of academic partnerships with national health professional organizations to increase adoption of evidence-based strategies to prevent alcohol-exposed pregnancies. Methods: Authors reviewed and summarized multi-level strategies created as part of the developmental phase of this project in order to report successes and challenges. We applied the three principles of reflection, sense-making, and reciprocal learning, as identified in the practice change literature, to synthesize our experience. Results: There were five primary lessons learned as a result of this work: Development of technology-based training websites requires significant time to design, implement, and test; project ‘mission-drift’ is inevitable, but not necessarily unwelcome; time and effort is required to create and sustain functioning workgroups when there are different organizational cultures; and changing real-world practice is hard to do, yet changing the conversation on screening and brief intervention is possible. Conclusions: Use of multi-level strategies within an academic–professional organization model was successful in promoting awareness and education of healthcare professionals in the prevention of alcohol-exposed pregnancies. View Full-Text
Keywords: alcohol-exposed pregnancy; screening and brief intervention; social–ecological model; academic–professional organization collaborative alcohol-exposed pregnancy; screening and brief intervention; social–ecological model; academic–professional organization collaborative
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
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Tenkku Lepper, L.; King, D.; Doll, J.; Gonzalez, S.; Mitchell, A.; Hartje, J. Partnering with the Health Professions to Promote Prevention of an Alcohol-Exposed Pregnancy: Lessons Learned from an Academic–Organizational Collaborative. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 1702.

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