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Open AccessCommentary

Linkage to Care Is Important and Necessary When Identifying Infections in Migrants

1
Department of Infection, Immunity and Inflammation, University of Leicester, Leicester, LE1 7RH, UK
2
Department of Infection and Tropical Medicine, University Hospitals Leicester NHS Trust, Leicester LE1 5WW, UK
3
European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control, 16973 Solna, Sweden
4
Section of Infectious Diseases and Immunity, Department of Medicine, Imperial College London, Hammersmith Hospital, London W12 0HS, UK
5
The Institute for Infection and Immunity, St George’s, University of London, London WC1E 7HU, UK
6
Department of Primary and Community Care, Radboud University Medical Center, 6525 GA Nijmegen, The Netherlands
7
Pharos, Dutch Centre of Expertise on Health Disparities, 3507 LH Utrecht, The Netherlands
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(7), 1550; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15071550
Received: 23 June 2018 / Revised: 16 July 2018 / Accepted: 17 July 2018 / Published: 22 July 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Refugee, Migrant and Ethnic Minority Health)
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PDF [258 KB, uploaded 22 July 2018]

Abstract

Migration is an important driver of population dynamics in Europe. Although migrants are generally healthy, subgroups of migrants are at increased risk of a range of infectious diseases. Early identification of infections is important as it prevents morbidity and mortality. However, identifying infections needs to be supported by appropriate systems to link individuals to specialist care where they can receive further diagnostic tests and clinical management. In this commentary we will discuss the importance of linkage to care and how to minimise attrition in clinical pathways. View Full-Text
Keywords: migration; health; infection; linkage; care migration; health; infection; linkage; care
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
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Pareek, M.; Noori, T.; Hargreaves, S.; Van den Muijsenbergh, M. Linkage to Care Is Important and Necessary When Identifying Infections in Migrants. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15, 1550.

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