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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(6), 1242; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15061242

Implementation of Active Workstations in University Libraries—A Comparison of Portable Pedal Exercise Machines and Standing Desks

1
École de kinesiologie et des sciences de l’activité physique, Université de Montréal, Montreal, QC H3T 1J4, Canada
2
HEC Montréal, Montréal, QC H3T 2A7, Canada
3
Centre de recherche du Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Sainte-Justine, Montréal, QC H3T 1C5, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 29 March 2018 / Revised: 31 May 2018 / Accepted: 7 June 2018 / Published: 12 June 2018
(This article belongs to the Section Occupational Safety and Health)
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Abstract

Sedentary behaviors are an important issue worldwide, as prolonged sitting time has been associated with health problems. Recently, active workstations have been developed as a strategy to counteract sedentary behaviors. The present study examined the rationale and perceptions of university students’ and staff following their first use of an active workstation in library settings. Ninety-nine volunteers completed a self-administered questionnaire after using a portable pedal exercise machine (PPEM) or a standing desk (SD). Computer tasks were performed on the SD (p = 0.001) and paperwork tasks on a PPEM (p = 0.037) to a larger extent. Men preferred the SD and women chose the PPEM (p = 0.037). The appreciation of the PPEM was revealed to be higher than for the SD, due to its higher scores for effective, useful, functional, convenient, and comfortable dimensions. Younger participants (<25 years of age) found the active workstation more pleasant to use than older participants, and participants who spent between 4 to 8 h per day in a seated position found active workstations were more effective and convenient than participants sitting fewer than 4 h per day. The results of this study are a preliminary step to better understanding the feasibility and acceptability of active workstations on university campuses. View Full-Text
Keywords: sedentary behaviors; prolonged sitting time; active workstations; standing workstations; university libraries; physical activity sedentary behaviors; prolonged sitting time; active workstations; standing workstations; university libraries; physical activity
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
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Bastien Tardif, C.; Cantin, M.; Sénécal, S.; Léger, P.-M.; Labonté-Lemoyne, É.; Begon, M.; Mathieu, M.-E. Implementation of Active Workstations in University Libraries—A Comparison of Portable Pedal Exercise Machines and Standing Desks. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15, 1242.

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