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Changes in Sitting Time and Sitting Fragmentation after a Workplace Sedentary Behaviour Intervention

1
Department of Exercise Science and Sport Studies, Springfield College, 263 Alden Street, Springfield, MA 01109, USA
2
School of Health, Physical Education and Recreation, Springfield College, 263 Alden Street, Springfield, MA 01109, USA
3
Cardiac Rehab/Non-Invasive Cardiology, Newton-Wellesley Hospital, 2014 Washington Street, Newton, MA 02462, USA
4
School of Psychological Science and Health, University of Strathclyde, 16 Richmond Street, Glasgow G1 1XQ, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(6), 1148; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15061148
Received: 4 May 2018 / Revised: 26 May 2018 / Accepted: 30 May 2018 / Published: 1 June 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Occupational Sedentary Behaviour)
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Abstract

Prolonged sedentary behaviour (SB) has shown to be detrimental to health. Nevertheless, population levels of SB are high and interventions to decrease SB are needed. This study aimed to explore the effect of a personalized intervention aimed at reducing SB and increasing breaks in SB among college employees. A pre-experimental study design was used. Participants (n = 36) were recruited at a college in Massachusetts, USA. SB was measured over 7 consecutive days using an activPAL3 accelerometer. Following baseline measures, all participants received a personalized SB consultation which focused on limiting bouts of SB >30 min, participants also received weekly follow-up e-mails. Post-intervention measures were taken after 16 weeks. Primary outcome variables were sedentary minutes/day and SB bouts >30 min. Differences between baseline and follow-up were analyzed using paired t-tests. The intervention did not change daily sedentary time (−0.48%; p > 0.05). The number of sedentary bouts >30 min decreased significantly by 0.52 bouts/day (p = 0.010). In this study, a personalized SB intervention was successful in reducing number of bouts >30 min of SB. However, daily sedentary time did not reduce significantly. These results indicate that personalized, consultation-based interventions may be effective if focused on a specific component of SB. View Full-Text
Keywords: sitting time; occupational; sedentary fragmentation; objective measurement sitting time; occupational; sedentary fragmentation; objective measurement
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Hutchinson, J.; Headley, S.; Matthews, T.; Spicer, G.; Dempsey, K.; Wooley, S.; Janssen, X. Changes in Sitting Time and Sitting Fragmentation after a Workplace Sedentary Behaviour Intervention. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15, 1148.

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