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Health and Well-Being of International University Students, and Comparison with Domestic Students, in Tasmania, Australia

1
Centre for Rural Health, University of Tasmania, Launceston 7250, Australia
2
School of Medicine, University of Tasmania, Hobart 7000, Australia
3
School of Demography, Australian National University, Canberra 0200, Australia
4
School of Education, University of Tasmania, Launceston 7250, Australia
5
School of Medicine, Western Sydney University, Sydney 2560, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(6), 1147; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15061147
Received: 5 May 2018 / Revised: 29 May 2018 / Accepted: 30 May 2018 / Published: 1 June 2018
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PDF [313 KB, uploaded 1 June 2018]

Abstract

International students comprise an increasingly larger proportion of higher education students globally. Empirical evidence about the health and well-being of these students is, however, limited. We sought to examine the health and well-being of international students, primarily from Asian countries, attending the University of Tasmania, Australia, using domestic students as a comparison group. Ethics approval was given to invite (via email) all currently enrolled students to participate in the study by completing a pilot-tested, online survey. The survey was completed by 382 international students (response rate = 8.9%) and 1013 domestic students (9.2%). Independent samples t-tests, analysis of variance (ANOVA) and chi-square tests were used for bivariate comparisons between international and domestic students, and between subgroups of international students. Regression models were used to examine the associations between student status (international vs. domestic) and health outcomes, controlling for demographic and enrolment variables. International students, particularly male students, were found to be at increased risk of several adverse health outcomes while also being less likely to seek help for mental health and related problems. The findings indicate the need for accessible, targeted, culturally-sensitive health promotion and early intervention programs. View Full-Text
Keywords: international students; Australia; health and well-being; help-seeking international students; Australia; health and well-being; help-seeking
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
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Skromanis, S.; Cooling, N.; Rodgers, B.; Purton, T.; Fan, F.; Bridgman, H.; Harris, K.; Presser, J.; Mond, J. Health and Well-Being of International University Students, and Comparison with Domestic Students, in Tasmania, Australia. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15, 1147.

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