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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle

Impact of a Translated Disease Self-Management Program on Employee Health and Productivity: Six-Month Findings from a Randomized Controlled Trial

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Center for Population Health and Aging, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843, USA
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Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, School of Public Health, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843, USA
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Workplace Health Group, Department of Health Promotion and Behavior, College of Public Health, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602, USA
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Department of Psychology, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602, USA
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Department of Management, Terry College of Business, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602, USA
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Department of Health Policy and Management, College of Public Health, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602, USA
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Self-Management Resource Center, Palo Alto, CA 94303, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(5), 851; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15050851
Received: 20 March 2018 / Revised: 9 April 2018 / Accepted: 19 April 2018 / Published: 25 April 2018
(This article belongs to the Collection Aging and Public Health)
Disease management is gaining importance in workplace health promotion given the aging workforce and rising chronic disease prevalence. The Chronic Disease Self-Management Program (CDSMP) is an effective intervention widely offered in diverse community settings; however, adoption remains low in workplace settings. As part of a larger NIH-funded randomized controlled trial, this study examines the effectiveness of a worksite-tailored version of CDSMP (wCDSMP [n = 72]) relative to CDSMP (‘Usual Care’ [n = 109]) to improve health and work performance among employees with one or more chronic conditions. Multiple-group latent-difference score models with sandwich estimators were fitted to identify changes from baseline to 6-month follow-up. Overall, participants were primarily female (87%), non-Hispanic white (62%), and obese (73%). On average, participants were age 48 (range: 23–72) and self-reported 3.25 chronic conditions (range: 1–16). The most commonly reported conditions were high cholesterol (45%), high blood pressure (45%), anxiety/emotional/mental health condition (26%), and diabetes (25%). Among wCDSMP participants, significant improvements were observed for physically unhealthy days (uΔ = −2.07, p = 0.018), fatigue (uΔ = −2.88, p = 0.002), sedentary behavior (uΔ = −4.49, p = 0.018), soda/sugar beverage consumption (uΔ = −0.78, p = 0.028), and fast food intake (uΔ = −0.76, p = 0.009) from baseline to follow-up. Significant improvements in patient–provider communication (uΔ = 0.46, p = 0.031) and mental work limitations (uΔ = −8.89, p = 0.010) were also observed from baseline to follow-up. Relative to Usual Care, wCDSMP participants reported significantly larger improvements in fatigue, physical activity, soda/sugar beverage consumption, and mental work limitations (p < 0.05). The translation of Usual Care (content and format) has potential to improve health among employees with chronic conditions and increase uptake in workplace settings. View Full-Text
Keywords: disease self-management; employee health; intervention translation; evidence-based program; Chronic Disease Self-Management Program; United States of America disease self-management; employee health; intervention translation; evidence-based program; Chronic Disease Self-Management Program; United States of America
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Smith, M.L.; Wilson, M.G.; Robertson, M.M.; Padilla, H.M.; Zuercher, H.; Vandenberg, R.; Corso, P.; Lorig, K.; Laurent, D.D.; DeJoy, D.M. Impact of a Translated Disease Self-Management Program on Employee Health and Productivity: Six-Month Findings from a Randomized Controlled Trial. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15, 851.

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