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Fine Particulate Matter Pollution and Risk of Community-Acquired Sepsis

1
Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35233, USA
2
Department of Epidemiology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1665 University Boulevard, RPHB, Birmingham, AL 35233, USA
3
Division of Public Health Sciences, Department of Surgery, Washington University in Saint Louis School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA
4
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA
5
Universities Space Research Association, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35805, USA
6
Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, 6431 Fannin St., JJL 434, Houston, TX 77030, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(4), 818; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15040818
Received: 26 March 2018 / Revised: 17 April 2018 / Accepted: 19 April 2018 / Published: 21 April 2018
(This article belongs to the Section Environmental Health)
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Abstract

While air pollution has been associated with health complications, its effect on sepsis risk is unknown. We examined the association between fine particulate matter (PM2.5) air pollution and risk of sepsis hospitalization. We analyzed data from the 30,239 community-dwelling adults in the Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) cohort linked with satellite-derived measures of PM2.5 data. We defined sepsis as a hospital admission for a serious infection with ≥2 systemic inflammatory response (SIRS) criteria. We performed incidence density sampling to match sepsis cases with 4 controls by age (±5 years), sex, and race. For each matched group we calculated mean daily PM2.5 exposures for short-term (30-day) and long-term (one-year) periods preceding the sepsis event. We used conditional logistic regression to evaluate the association between PM2.5 exposure and sepsis, adjusting for education, income, region, temperature, urbanicity, tobacco and alcohol use, and medical conditions. We matched 1386 sepsis cases with 5544 non-sepsis controls. Mean 30-day PM2.5 exposure levels (Cases 12.44 vs. Controls 12.34 µg/m3; p = 0.28) and mean one-year PM2.5 exposure levels (Cases 12.53 vs. Controls 12.50 µg/m3; p = 0.66) were similar between cases and controls. In adjusted models, there were no associations between 30-day PM2.5 exposure levels and sepsis (4th vs. 1st quartiles OR: 1.06, 95% CI: 0.85–1.32). Similarly, there were no associations between one-year PM2.5 exposure levels and sepsis risk (4th vs. 1st quartiles OR: 0.96, 95% CI: 0.78–1.18). In the REGARDS cohort, PM2.5 air pollution exposure was not associated with risk of sepsis. View Full-Text
Keywords: sepsis; air pollution; particulate matter sepsis; air pollution; particulate matter
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Sarmiento, E.J.; Moore, J.X.; McClure, L.A.; Griffin, R.; Al-Hamdan, M.Z.; Wang, H.E. Fine Particulate Matter Pollution and Risk of Community-Acquired Sepsis. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15, 818.

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