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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(2), 240; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15020240

The Influence of Supportive and Ethical Work Environments on Work-Related Accidents, Injuries, and Serious Psychological Distress among Hospital Nurses

1
Faculty of Nursing, Kyoto Tachibana University, Kyoto 607-8175, Japan
2
Mental Health and Nursing Research Team, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science, Tokyo 156-8506, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 13 December 2017 / Revised: 28 January 2018 / Accepted: 29 January 2018 / Published: 31 January 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Healthcare Quality and Patient Satisfaction)
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Abstract

The healthcare industry in Japan has experienced many cases of work-related injuries, accidents, and workers’ compensation claims because of mental illness. This study examined the influence of supportive and ethical work environments on work-related accidents, injuries, and serious psychological distress among hospital nurses. Self-reported questionnaires were distributed to nurses (n = 1114) from 11 hospitals. Valid responses (n = 822, 93% women, mean age = 38.49 ± 10.09 years) were used for analyses. The questionnaire included items addressing basic attributes, work and organizational characteristics, social capital and ethical climate at the workplace, psychological distress, and experience of work-related accidents or injuries in the last half year. The final model of a multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that those who work less than 4 h of overtime per week (OR = 0.313), those who work on days off more than once per month (OR = 0.424), and an exclusive workplace climate (OR = 1.314) were significantly associated with work-related accidents or injuries. Additionally, an exclusive workplace climate (OR = 1.696) elevated the risk of serious psychological distress. To prevent work-related compensation cases, which are caused by these variables, strengthening hospitals’ occupational health and safety is necessary. View Full-Text
Keywords: nurse; work-related accident or injury; psychological distress; occupational health and safety; social capital; ethical climate; work environment nurse; work-related accident or injury; psychological distress; occupational health and safety; social capital; ethical climate; work environment
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
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Tei-Tominaga, M.; Nakanishi, M. The Influence of Supportive and Ethical Work Environments on Work-Related Accidents, Injuries, and Serious Psychological Distress among Hospital Nurses. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15, 240.

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