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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(2), 227; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15020227

Do Working Conditions of Patients in Psychotherapeutic Consultation in the Workplace Differ from Those in Outpatient Care? Results from an Observational Study

1
Department of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Clinic Ulm, 89081 Ulm, Germany
2
Department of Psychiatry II, University Clinic Ulm, BKH 89312 Guenzburg, Germany
3
ZfP Suedwuerttemberg, Sonnenbergklinik, 70597 Stuttgart, Germany
4
Institute for Occupational and Social Medicine and Health Services Research, University Clinic Tuebingen, Competence Centre Health Services Research, Medical Faculty Tuebingen, 72074 Tuebingen, Germany
5
Leadership Personality Center Ulm, Ulm University, 89073 Ulm, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 30 November 2017 / Revised: 24 January 2018 / Accepted: 25 January 2018 / Published: 30 January 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Work Stress and the Development of Chronic Diseases)
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Abstract

In previous studies, it was found that patients treated at a psychosomatic outpatient clinic (PSOC) for common mental disorders showed more severe symptoms than those who used a psychotherapeutic consultation service at the workplace (PSIW). This study examines whether the higher symptom severity of the PSOC patients in comparison to their PSIW counterparts is also related to higher levels of occupational stress as measured by the demand-control-support model (DCS). N = 253 participants (PSIW n = 100; PSOC n = 153) provided self-reported data on demands, decision latitude, social support, and health before consultation. The association between mental health care setting, symptom level and demands, decision latitude, and social support was assessed by means of a path model. Results of the path model indicated that the higher level of depression in PSOC patients was related to higher levels of demands and lower levels of social support. Demands and social support were found to be indirectly associated with treatment setting. No interaction effect between demands, decision latitude, social support, and depression was found. Results of this study reveal that the working conditions influenced the pathway to care process via symptom severity. View Full-Text
Keywords: workplace perception; demand-control-support model; depression; health services research; early intervention; help-seeking behavior workplace perception; demand-control-support model; depression; health services research; early intervention; help-seeking behavior
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Barrech, A.; Kilian, R.; Rottler, E.; Jerg-Bretzke, L.; Hölzer, M.; Rieger, M.A.; Jarczok, M.N.; Gündel, H.; Rothermund, E. Do Working Conditions of Patients in Psychotherapeutic Consultation in the Workplace Differ from Those in Outpatient Care? Results from an Observational Study. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15, 227.

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