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Physical Activity Programming Advertised on Websites of U.S. Islamic Centers: A Content Analysis

School of Exercise and Nutritional Sciences, San Diego State University, 5500 Campanile Drive, San Diego, CA 92182-7251, USA
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(11), 2581; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15112581
Received: 26 October 2018 / Revised: 13 November 2018 / Accepted: 14 November 2018 / Published: 18 November 2018
(This article belongs to the Collection Health Behaviors, Risk Factors, NCDs and Health Promotion)
Previous research has found churches to be effective at delivering physical activity (PA) programs to their congregants. Mosques, however, have not been extensively studied. Therefore, we quantified U.S. Islamic centers’ advertisement of PA programming and examined their programming characteristics. We conducted a content analysis of the websites of 773 eligible Islamic centers of which 206 centers in 32 states advertised PA programming. We categorized PA by program type: camping, fitness classes, sports, youth programs, and irregular offerings. We calculated descriptive statistics by program type for specific activity, frequency/duration/volume, participant/instructor sex, and instructor religion. Youth group (44%) and sports (23%) programs were most and least frequently advertised, respectively. Most centers (66%) that posted information on PA programming advertised only one program type. Men and Muslims taught most activities. Most activities—except for fitness classes—were advertised to a male audience. Islamic centers should offer and advertise additional PA programming—especially for women—and better utilize their websites for promoting such programming. Individual Islamic centers and Islamic- and non-religion based public health agencies can utilize our findings to fashion future PA offerings. View Full-Text
Keywords: physical activity; health promotion; Internet; religious institutions; Islam physical activity; health promotion; Internet; religious institutions; Islam
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MDPI and ACS Style

Kahan, D. Physical Activity Programming Advertised on Websites of U.S. Islamic Centers: A Content Analysis. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15, 2581. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15112581

AMA Style

Kahan D. Physical Activity Programming Advertised on Websites of U.S. Islamic Centers: A Content Analysis. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2018; 15(11):2581. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15112581

Chicago/Turabian Style

Kahan, David. 2018. "Physical Activity Programming Advertised on Websites of U.S. Islamic Centers: A Content Analysis" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 15, no. 11: 2581. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15112581

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