Next Article in Journal
Bioactivity of Chitosan-Based Particles Loaded with Plant-Derived Extracts for Biomedical Applications: Emphasis on Antimicrobial Fiber-Based Systems
Next Article in Special Issue
In Silico Screening of Bioactive Compounds of Representative Seaweeds to Inhibit SARS-CoV-2 ACE2-Bound Omicron B.1.1.529 Spike Protein Trimer
Previous Article in Journal
Microalgae as Sustainable Bio-Factories of Healthy Lipids: Evaluating Fatty Acid Content and Antioxidant Activity
Previous Article in Special Issue
An Overview to the Health Benefits of Seaweeds Consumption
Review

Seaweed Components as Potential Modulators of the Gut Microbiota

1
Food Biosciences, Teagasc Food Research Centre, Ashtown, D15 KN3K Dublin, Ireland
2
CSIRO Health and Biosecurity, Kintore Avenue, Adelaide, SA 5000, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Diana Cláudia Pinto
Mar. Drugs 2021, 19(7), 358; https://doi.org/10.3390/md19070358
Received: 10 May 2021 / Revised: 20 June 2021 / Accepted: 20 June 2021 / Published: 23 June 2021
Macroalgae, or seaweeds, are a rich source of components which may exert beneficial effects on the mammalian gut microbiota through the enhancement of bacterial diversity and abundance. An imbalance of gut bacteria has been linked to the development of disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease, immunodeficiency, hypertension, type-2-diabetes, obesity, and cancer. This review outlines current knowledge from in vitro and in vivo studies concerning the potential therapeutic application of seaweed-derived polysaccharides, polyphenols and peptides to modulate the gut microbiota through diet. Polysaccharides such as fucoidan, laminarin, alginate, ulvan and porphyran are unique to seaweeds. Several studies have shown their potential to act as prebiotics and to positively modulate the gut microbiota. Prebiotics enhance bacterial populations and often their production of short chain fatty acids, which are the energy source for gastrointestinal epithelial cells, provide protection against pathogens, influence immunomodulation, and induce apoptosis of colon cancer cells. The oral bioaccessibility and bioavailability of seaweed components is also discussed, including the advantages and limitations of static and dynamic in vitro gastrointestinal models versus ex vivo and in vivo methods. Seaweed bioactives show potential for use in prevention and, in some instances, treatment of human disease. However, it is also necessary to confirm these potential, therapeutic effects in large-scale clinical trials. Where possible, we have cited information concerning these trials. View Full-Text
Keywords: seaweed; prebiotics; gut microbiota; polysaccharides; polyphenols; peptides; colonic fermentation; short chain fatty acids; bioaccessibility; simulated gastrointestinal and fermentation digestion models seaweed; prebiotics; gut microbiota; polysaccharides; polyphenols; peptides; colonic fermentation; short chain fatty acids; bioaccessibility; simulated gastrointestinal and fermentation digestion models
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

MDPI and ACS Style

Shannon, E.; Conlon, M.; Hayes, M. Seaweed Components as Potential Modulators of the Gut Microbiota. Mar. Drugs 2021, 19, 358. https://doi.org/10.3390/md19070358

AMA Style

Shannon E, Conlon M, Hayes M. Seaweed Components as Potential Modulators of the Gut Microbiota. Marine Drugs. 2021; 19(7):358. https://doi.org/10.3390/md19070358

Chicago/Turabian Style

Shannon, Emer, Michael Conlon, and Maria Hayes. 2021. "Seaweed Components as Potential Modulators of the Gut Microbiota" Marine Drugs 19, no. 7: 358. https://doi.org/10.3390/md19070358

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop