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Marine Collagen from Alternative and Sustainable Sources: Extraction, Processing and Applications

1
Department of Marine Biotechnology, Stazione Zoologica Anton Dohrn, Villa Comunale, 80121 Napoli, Italy
2
Institute of Biosciences and BioResources (IBBR), National Research Council, Via Pietro Castellino 111, 80131 Naples, Italy
3
Institute of Polymers, Composites and Biomaterials, National Research Council, P.le E. Fermi 1, Portici, 80055 Naples, Italy
4
Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology (IBBC), National Research Council, Via Pietro Castellino 111, 80131 Naples, Italy
5
Department of Integrative Marine Ecology, Stazione Zoologica Anton Dohrn, Villa Comunale, 80121 Napoli, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Mar. Drugs 2020, 18(4), 214; https://doi.org/10.3390/md18040214
Received: 24 March 2020 / Revised: 11 April 2020 / Accepted: 13 April 2020 / Published: 15 April 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Papers from MarPipe and Ocean Medicines)
Due to its unique properties, collagen is used in the growing fields of pharmaceutical and biomedical devices, as well as in the fields of nutraceuticals, cosmeceuticals, food and beverages. Collagen also represents a valid resource for bioplastics and biomaterials, to be used in the emerging health sectors. Recently, marine organisms have been considered as promising sources of collagen, because they do not harbor transmissible disease. In particular, fish biomass as well as by-catch organisms, such as undersized fish, jellyfish, sharks, starfish, and sponges, possess a very high collagen content. The use of discarded and underused biomass could contribute to the development of a sustainable process for collagen extraction, with a significantly reduced environmental impact. This addresses the European zero-waste strategy, which supports all three generally accepted goals of sustainability: sustainable economic well-being, environmental protection, and social well-being. A zero-waste strategy would use far fewer new raw materials and send no waste materials to landfills. In this review, we present an overview of the studies carried out on collagen obtained from by-catch organisms and fish wastes. Additionally, we discuss novel technologies based on thermoplastic processes that could be applied, likewise, as marine collagen treatment. View Full-Text
Keywords: marine collagen; marine gelatin; sustainable sources; by-catch; discards; protocols marine collagen; marine gelatin; sustainable sources; by-catch; discards; protocols
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MDPI and ACS Style

Coppola, D.; Oliviero, M.; Vitale, G.A.; Lauritano, C.; D’Ambra, I.; Iannace, S.; de Pascale, D. Marine Collagen from Alternative and Sustainable Sources: Extraction, Processing and Applications. Mar. Drugs 2020, 18, 214.

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