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Open AccessArticle

Herring Milt Protein Hydrolysate Improves Insulin Resistance in High-Fat-Diet-Induced Obese Male C57BL/6J Mice

1
Aquatic and Crop Resource Development Research Center, National Research Council of Canada, Charlottetown, PE C1A 4P3, Canada
2
Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE C1A 4P3, Canada
3
VALORēS Research Institute Inc., Shippagan, NB E8S 1J2, Canada
4
Campus of Shippagan, University of Moncton, Shippagan, NB E8S 1P6, Canada
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Mar. Drugs 2019, 17(8), 456; https://doi.org/10.3390/md17080456
Received: 9 July 2019 / Revised: 27 July 2019 / Accepted: 31 July 2019 / Published: 3 August 2019
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Abstract

Protein consumption influences glucose homeostasis, but the effect depends on the type and origin of proteins ingested. The present study was designed to determine the effect of herring milt protein hydrolysate (HPH) on insulin function and glucose metabolism in a mouse model of diet-induced obesity. Male C57BL/6J mice were pretreated with a low-fat diet or a high-fat diet for 6 weeks. Mice on the high-fat diet were divided into four groups where one group continued on the high-fat diet and the other three groups were fed a modified high-fat diet where 15%, 35%, and 70%, respectively, of casein was replaced with an equal percentage of protein derived from HPH. After 10 weeks, mice that continued on the high-fat diet showed significant increases in body weight, blood glucose, insulin, and leptin levels and exhibited impaired oral glucose tolerance, insulin resistance, and pancreatic β-cell dysfunction. Compared to mice fed the high-fat diet, the 70% replacement of dietary casein with HPH protein reduced body weight, semi-fasting blood glucose, fasting blood glucose, insulin, leptin, and cholesterol levels and improved glucose tolerance, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), and homeostasis model assessment of β-cell function (HOMA-β) indices. The 35% replacement of dietary casein with HPH protein showed moderate effects, while the 15% replacement of dietary casein with HPH protein had no effects. This is the first study demonstrating that replacing dietary casein with the same amount of protein derived from HPH can prevent high-fat-diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance. View Full-Text
Keywords: herring milt protein hydrolysate; type 2 diabetes; diet-induced obese mice; blood glucose; insulin; leptin; oral glucose tolerance; HOMA-IR; HOMA-β herring milt protein hydrolysate; type 2 diabetes; diet-induced obese mice; blood glucose; insulin; leptin; oral glucose tolerance; HOMA-IR; HOMA-β
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Wang, Y.; Gagnon, J.; Nair, S.; Sha, S. Herring Milt Protein Hydrolysate Improves Insulin Resistance in High-Fat-Diet-Induced Obese Male C57BL/6J Mice. Mar. Drugs 2019, 17, 456.

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