Next Article in Journal
Identification and Molecular Docking Study of a Novel Angiotensin-I Converting Enzyme Inhibitory Peptide Derived from Enzymatic Hydrolysates of Cyclina sinensis
Previous Article in Journal
Benderamide A, a Cyclic Depsipeptide from a Singapore Collection of Marine Cyanobacterium cf. Lyngbya sp.
Previous Article in Special Issue
Structure and Bioactivity Screening of a Low Molecular Weight Ulvan from the Green Alga Ulothrix flacca
Article Menu
Issue 11 (November) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessReview
Mar. Drugs 2018, 16(11), 410; https://doi.org/10.3390/md16110410

Seaweed Secondary Metabolites In Vitro and In Vivo Anticancer Activity

1
Department of Chemistry & QOPNA-Organic Chemistry, Natural Products and Food Stuffs, University of Aveiro, Campus de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro, Portugal
2
cE3c-Centre for Ecology, Evolution and Environmental Changes, Azorean Biodiversity Group & Faculty of Sciences and Technology, University of Azores, Rua Mãe de Deus, 9501-321 Ponta Delgada, Portugal
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 14 October 2018 / Revised: 22 October 2018 / Accepted: 23 October 2018 / Published: 26 October 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Discovery and Application of Macroalgae-Derived Natural Products)
Full-Text   |   PDF [3163 KB, uploaded 29 October 2018]   |  

Abstract

Isolation, finding or discovery of novel anticancer agents is very important for cancer treatment, and seaweeds are one of the largest producers of chemically active metabolites with valuable cytotoxic properties, and therefore can be used as new chemotherapeutic agents or source of inspiration to develop new ones. Identification of the more potent and selective anticancer components isolated from brown, green and red seaweeds, as well as studies of their mode of action is very attractive and constitute a small but relevant progress for pharmacological applications. Several researchers have carried out in vitro and in vivo studies in various cell lines and have disclosed the active metabolites among the terpenoids, including carotenoids, polyphenols and alkaloids that can be found in seaweeds. In this review the type of metabolites and their cytotoxic or antiproliferative effects will be discussed additionally their mode of action, structure-activity relationship and selectivity will also be revealed. The diterpene dictyolactone, the sterol cholest-5-en-3β,7α-diol and the halogenated monoterpene halomon are among the reported compounds, the ones that present sub-micromolar cytotoxicity. Additionally, one dimeric sesquiterpene of the cyclolaurane-type, three bromophenols and one halogenated monoterpene should be emphasized because they exhibit half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values between 1–5 µM against several cell lines. View Full-Text
Keywords: seaweeds; secondary metabolites; cytotoxic activity; cancer; terpenoids; bromophenols; dictyolactone; cholest-5-en-3β,7α-diol; halomon; laurebiphenyl seaweeds; secondary metabolites; cytotoxic activity; cancer; terpenoids; bromophenols; dictyolactone; cholest-5-en-3β,7α-diol; halomon; laurebiphenyl
Figures

Graphical abstract

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Rocha, D.H.A.; Seca, A.M.L.; Pinto, D.C.G.A. Seaweed Secondary Metabolites In Vitro and In Vivo Anticancer Activity. Mar. Drugs 2018, 16, 410.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Mar. Drugs EISSN 1660-3397 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top