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Case Report

Single Incision Pediatric Endoscopic Surgery: From Myth to Reality a Case Series

1
Division of Pediatric Surgery, Children’s Hospital Colorado, University of Colorado, Anschutz Medical Campus, 13123 East 16th Ave, B323, Aurora, CO 80045, USA
2
Division of Pediatric Surgery, University Children’s Hospital of Basel, 4056 Basel, Switzerland
3
Division of Pediatric Surgery, University of Basel, 4056 Basel, Switzerland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Medicina 2019, 55(9), 574; https://doi.org/10.3390/medicina55090574
Received: 24 July 2019 / Revised: 3 September 2019 / Accepted: 5 September 2019 / Published: 7 September 2019
Laparoscopic surgery has continued to evolve to minimize access sites and scars in both the adult and pediatric populations. In children, single-incision pediatric endoscopic surgery (SIPES) has been shown to be effective, feasible, and safe with comparative results to multiport equivalents. Thus, the use of SIPES continues over increasingly complex cases, however, conceptions of its efficacy continue to vary greatly. In the present case series and discussion, we review the history of SIPES techniques and its current application today. We present this in the setting of five common myths about SIPES techniques: limitations against complex cases, restrictions to specialized training, increased morbidity outcomes, increased operative lengths, and increased operative costs. Regarding the myth of SIPES being limited in application to simple cases, examples were highlighted throughout the literature in addition to the authors’ own experience with three complex cases including resection of a lymphatic malformation, splenectomy with cholecystectomy, and distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy. A review of SIPES learning curves shows equivalent operative outcomes to multiport learning curves and advancements towards practical workshops to increase trainee familiarity can help assuage these aptitudes. In assessing comorbidities, adult literature reveals a slight increase in incisional hernia rates, but this does not correlate with single-incision pediatric data. In experienced hands, operative SIPES times average approximate multiport laparoscopic equivalents. Finally, regarding expenses, SIPES represents an equivalent alternative to laparoscopic techniques. View Full-Text
Keywords: single-incision; pediatric surgery; laparoscopic; minimally invasive single-incision; pediatric surgery; laparoscopic; minimally invasive
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MDPI and ACS Style

Wallace, B.J.; Vuille-dit-Bille, R.N.; Marwan, A.I. Single Incision Pediatric Endoscopic Surgery: From Myth to Reality a Case Series. Medicina 2019, 55, 574. https://doi.org/10.3390/medicina55090574

AMA Style

Wallace BJ, Vuille-dit-Bille RN, Marwan AI. Single Incision Pediatric Endoscopic Surgery: From Myth to Reality a Case Series. Medicina. 2019; 55(9):574. https://doi.org/10.3390/medicina55090574

Chicago/Turabian Style

Wallace, Bradley J., Raphael N. Vuille-dit-Bille, and Ahmed I. Marwan. 2019. "Single Incision Pediatric Endoscopic Surgery: From Myth to Reality a Case Series" Medicina 55, no. 9: 574. https://doi.org/10.3390/medicina55090574

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