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Review

Antimicrobial Properties of Antidepressants and Antipsychotics—Possibilities and Implications

by 1,2,* and 1,2,3
1
Department of Chemistry, Life Sciences and Environmental Sustainability, University of Parma, Parco Area delle Scienze 11/A, 43124 Parma, Italy
2
Interdepartmental Center SITEIA.PARMA, University of Parma, Parco Area delle Scienze 181/A, 43124 Parma, Italy
3
Italian National Interuniversity Consortium for Environmental Sciences (CINSA), University of Parma, 43124 Parma, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Maria Emília de Sousa
Pharmaceuticals 2021, 14(9), 915; https://doi.org/10.3390/ph14090915
Received: 3 August 2021 / Revised: 3 September 2021 / Accepted: 8 September 2021 / Published: 10 September 2021
(This article belongs to the Collection Old Pharmaceuticals with New Applications)
The spreading of antibiotic resistance is responsible annually for over 700,000 deaths worldwide, and the prevision is that this number will increase exponentially. The identification of new antimicrobial treatments is a challenge that requires scientists all over the world to collaborate. Developing new drugs is an extremely long and costly process, but it could be paralleled by drug repositioning. The latter aims at identifying new clinical targets of an “old” drug that has already been tested, approved, and even marketed. This approach is very intriguing as it could reduce costs and speed up approval timelines, since data from preclinical studies and on pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and toxicity are already available. Antidepressants and antipsychotics have been described to inhibit planktonic and sessile growth of different yeasts and bacteria. The main findings in the field are discussed in this critical review, along with the description of the possible microbial targets of these molecules. Considering their antimicrobial activity, the manuscript highlights important implications that the administration of antidepressants and antipsychotics may have on the gut microbiome. View Full-Text
Keywords: antidepressants; antipsychotics; antimicrobials; drug repurposing antidepressants; antipsychotics; antimicrobials; drug repurposing
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MDPI and ACS Style

Caldara, M.; Marmiroli, N. Antimicrobial Properties of Antidepressants and Antipsychotics—Possibilities and Implications. Pharmaceuticals 2021, 14, 915. https://doi.org/10.3390/ph14090915

AMA Style

Caldara M, Marmiroli N. Antimicrobial Properties of Antidepressants and Antipsychotics—Possibilities and Implications. Pharmaceuticals. 2021; 14(9):915. https://doi.org/10.3390/ph14090915

Chicago/Turabian Style

Caldara, Marina, and Nelson Marmiroli. 2021. "Antimicrobial Properties of Antidepressants and Antipsychotics—Possibilities and Implications" Pharmaceuticals 14, no. 9: 915. https://doi.org/10.3390/ph14090915

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