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Article

Making Historical Gyroscopes Alive—2D and 3D Preservations by Sensor Fusion and Open Data Access

1
Institute for Photogrammetry, University of Stuttgart, 70174 Stuttgart, Germany
2
Chair of Adaptive Structures in Aerospace Engineering, University of Stuttgart, 70569 Stuttgart, Germany
3
Institute of History, University of Stuttgart, 70174 Stuttgart, Germany
4
Institute of Parallel and Distributed Systems, University of Stuttgart, 70569 Stuttgart, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Mehmet Rasit Yuce
Sensors 2021, 21(3), 957; https://doi.org/10.3390/s21030957
Received: 7 December 2020 / Revised: 23 January 2021 / Accepted: 25 January 2021 / Published: 1 February 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sensors: 20th Anniversary)
The preservation of cultural heritage assets of all kind is an important task for modern civilizations. This also includes tools and instruments that have been used in the previous decades and centuries. Along with the industrial revolution 200 years ago, mechanical and electrical technologies emerged, together with optical instruments. In the meantime, it is not only museums who showcase these developments, but also companies, universities, and private institutions. Gyroscopes are fascinating instruments with a history dating back 200 years. When J.G.F. Bohnenberger presented his machine to his students in 1810 at the University of Tuebingen, Germany, nobody could have foreseen that this fascinating development would be used for complex orientation and positioning. At the University of Stuttgart, Germany, a collection of 160 exhibits is available and in transition towards their sustainable future. Here, the systems are digitized in 2D, 2.5D, and 3D and are made available for a worldwide community using open access platforms. The technologies being used are computed tomography, computer vision, endoscopy, and photogrammetry. We present a novel workflow for combining voxel representations and colored point clouds, to create digital twins of the physical objects with 0.1 mm precision. This has not yet been investigated and is therefore pioneering work. Advantages and disadvantages are discussed and suggested work for the near future is outlined in this new and challenging field of tech heritage digitization. View Full-Text
Keywords: history of technology; computer vision; photogrammetry; endoscopy; computed tomography; convolutional neural networks; structure-from-motion; dense image matching; data fusion; sensor fusion; digital twin; navigation instruments; inertial sensors history of technology; computer vision; photogrammetry; endoscopy; computed tomography; convolutional neural networks; structure-from-motion; dense image matching; data fusion; sensor fusion; digital twin; navigation instruments; inertial sensors
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MDPI and ACS Style

Fritsch, D.; Wagner, J.F.; Ceranski, B.; Simon, S.; Niklaus, M.; Zhan, K.; Mammadov, G. Making Historical Gyroscopes Alive—2D and 3D Preservations by Sensor Fusion and Open Data Access. Sensors 2021, 21, 957. https://doi.org/10.3390/s21030957

AMA Style

Fritsch D, Wagner JF, Ceranski B, Simon S, Niklaus M, Zhan K, Mammadov G. Making Historical Gyroscopes Alive—2D and 3D Preservations by Sensor Fusion and Open Data Access. Sensors. 2021; 21(3):957. https://doi.org/10.3390/s21030957

Chicago/Turabian Style

Fritsch, Dieter, Jörg F. Wagner, Beate Ceranski, Sven Simon, Maria Niklaus, Kun Zhan, and Gasim Mammadov. 2021. "Making Historical Gyroscopes Alive—2D and 3D Preservations by Sensor Fusion and Open Data Access" Sensors 21, no. 3: 957. https://doi.org/10.3390/s21030957

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