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Perspective

CyberEye: New Eye-Tracking Interfaces for Assessment and Modulation of Cognitive Functions beyond the Brain

1
Department of Multimedia Systems, Telecommunications and Informatics, BioTechMed Center, Faculty of Electronics, Gdansk University of Technology, 80-233 Gdansk, Poland
2
Department of Physiology and Biomedical Engineering, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55901, USA
3
Department of Neurology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55901, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Miguel Ángel López Gordo and Christian A. Morillas Gutiérrez
Sensors 2021, 21(22), 7605; https://doi.org/10.3390/s21227605
Received: 13 October 2021 / Revised: 9 November 2021 / Accepted: 11 November 2021 / Published: 16 November 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Brain–Computer Interfaces: Advances and Challenges)
The emergence of innovative neurotechnologies in global brain projects has accelerated research and clinical applications of BCIs beyond sensory and motor functions. Both invasive and noninvasive sensors are developed to interface with cognitive functions engaged in thinking, communication, or remembering. The detection of eye movements by a camera offers a particularly attractive external sensor for computer interfaces to monitor, assess, and control these higher brain functions without acquiring signals from the brain. Features of gaze position and pupil dilation can be effectively used to track our attention in healthy mental processes, to enable interaction in disorders of consciousness, or to even predict memory performance in various brain diseases. In this perspective article, we propose the term ‘CyberEye’ to encompass emerging cognitive applications of eye-tracking interfaces for neuroscience research, clinical practice, and the biomedical industry. As CyberEye technologies continue to develop, we expect BCIs to become less dependent on brain activities, to be less invasive, and to thus be more applicable. View Full-Text
Keywords: pupillometry; eye tracking; memory and cognition; CyberEye pupillometry; eye tracking; memory and cognition; CyberEye
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MDPI and ACS Style

Lech, M.; Czyżewski, A.; Kucewicz, M.T. CyberEye: New Eye-Tracking Interfaces for Assessment and Modulation of Cognitive Functions beyond the Brain. Sensors 2021, 21, 7605. https://doi.org/10.3390/s21227605

AMA Style

Lech M, Czyżewski A, Kucewicz MT. CyberEye: New Eye-Tracking Interfaces for Assessment and Modulation of Cognitive Functions beyond the Brain. Sensors. 2021; 21(22):7605. https://doi.org/10.3390/s21227605

Chicago/Turabian Style

Lech, Michał, Andrzej Czyżewski, and Michał T. Kucewicz. 2021. "CyberEye: New Eye-Tracking Interfaces for Assessment and Modulation of Cognitive Functions beyond the Brain" Sensors 21, no. 22: 7605. https://doi.org/10.3390/s21227605

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