Next Article in Journal
Fabrication of MEMS Directional Acoustic Sensors for Underwater Operation
Previous Article in Journal
On the Design of Thermal-Aware Duty-Cycle MAC Protocol for IoT Healthcare
Previous Article in Special Issue
Validation of Wireless Sensors for Psychophysiological Studies
Open AccessArticle

Comparison between Full Body Motion Recognition Camera Interaction and Hand Controllers Interaction used in Virtual Reality Exposure Therapy for Acrophobia

1
School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National Technical University of Athens, 15780 Athens, Greece
2
Department of Informatics and Telecommunications, National Kapodistrian University of Athens, 15784 Athens, Greece
3
Department of Biology, National Kapodistrian University of Athens, 15784 Athens, Greece
4
Agioi Anargyroi, General & Oncological Hospital, 14564 Athens, Greece
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sensors 2020, 20(5), 1244; https://doi.org/10.3390/s20051244
Received: 16 December 2019 / Revised: 10 February 2020 / Accepted: 14 February 2020 / Published: 25 February 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Trends in Psychophysiology and Mental Health)
Virtual Reality has already been proven as a useful supplementary treatment tool for anxiety disorders. However, no specific technological importance has been given so far on how to apply Virtual Reality with a way that properly stimulates the phobic stimulus and provide the necessary means for lifelike experience. Thanks to technological advancements, there is now a variety of hardware that can help enhance stronger emotions generated by Virtual Reality systems. This study aims to evaluate the feeling of presence during different hardware setups of Virtual Reality Exposure Therapy, and, particularly how the user’s interaction with those setups can affects their sense of presence during the virtual simulation. An acrophobic virtual scenario is used as a case study by 20 phobic individuals and the Witmer–Singer presence questionnaire was used for presence evaluation by the users of the system. Statistical analysis on their answers revealed that the proposed full body Motion Recognition Cameras system generates a better feeling of presence compared to the Hand Controllers system. This is thanks to the Motion Recognition Cameras, which track and allow display of the user’s entire body within the virtual environment. Thus, the users are enabled to interact and confront the anxiety-provoking stimulus as in real world. Further studies are recommended, in which the proposed system could be used in Virtual Reality Exposure Therapy trials with acrophobic patients and other anxiety disorders as well, since the proposed system can provide natural interaction in various simulated environments. View Full-Text
Keywords: virtual reality; cognitive behavioral therapy; exposure therapy; anxiety disorders; specific phobias; acrophobia; motion tracking sensor; motion recognition camera; hand controllers; presence; immersion virtual reality; cognitive behavioral therapy; exposure therapy; anxiety disorders; specific phobias; acrophobia; motion tracking sensor; motion recognition camera; hand controllers; presence; immersion
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Kritikos, J.; Zoitaki, C.; Tzannetos, G.; Mehmeti, A.; Douloudi, M.; Nikolaou, G.; Alevizopoulos, G.; Koutsouris, D. Comparison between Full Body Motion Recognition Camera Interaction and Hand Controllers Interaction used in Virtual Reality Exposure Therapy for Acrophobia. Sensors 2020, 20, 1244.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop