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Article

Feasibility of Volatile Biomarker-Based Detection of Pythium Leak in Postharvest Stored Potato Tubers Using Field Asymmetric Ion Mobility Spectrometry

1
Department of Biological Systems Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164, USA
2
Center for Precision and Automated Agricultural Systems, Washington State University, Prosser, WA 99350, USA
3
Department of Entomology, Plant Pathology and Nematology, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 83844-2329, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sensors 2020, 20(24), 7350; https://doi.org/10.3390/s20247350
Received: 5 November 2020 / Revised: 17 December 2020 / Accepted: 17 December 2020 / Published: 21 December 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sensing Technologies for Agricultural Automation and Robotics)
The study evaluates the suitability of a field asymmetric ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) system for early detection of the Pythium leak disease in potato tubers simulating bulk storage conditions. Tubers of Ranger Russet (RR) and Russet Burbank (RB) cultivars were inoculated with Pythium ultimum, the causal agent of Pythium leak (with negative control samples as well) and placed in glass jars. The headspace in sampling jars was scanned using the FAIMS system at regular intervals (in days up to 14 and 31 days for the tubers stored at 25 °C and 4 °C, respectively) to acquire ion mobility current profiles representing the volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Principal component analysis plots revealed that VOCs ion peak profiles specific to Pythium ultimum were detected for the cultivars as early as one day after inoculation (DAI) at room temperature storage condition, while delayed detection was observed for tubers stored at 4 °C (RR: 5th DAI and RB: 10th DAI), possibly due to a slower disease progression at a lower temperature. There was also some overlap between control and inoculated samples at a lower temperature, which could be because of the limited volatile release. Additionally, data suggested that the RB cultivar might be less susceptible to Pythium ultimum under reduced temperature storage conditions. Disease symptom-specific critical compensation voltage (CV) and dispersion field (DF) from FAIMS responses were in the ranges of −0.58 to −2.97 V and 30–84% for the tubers stored at room temperature, and −0.31 to −2.97 V and 28–90% for reduced temperature, respectively. The ion current intensities at −1.31 V CV and 74% DF showed distinctive temporal progression associated with healthy control and infected tuber samples. View Full-Text
Keywords: potato storage; postharvest losses; rot detection; volatile compounds; FAIMS potato storage; postharvest losses; rot detection; volatile compounds; FAIMS
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MDPI and ACS Style

Kothawade, G.S.; Sankaran, S.; Bates, A.A.; Schroeder, B.K.; Khot, L.R. Feasibility of Volatile Biomarker-Based Detection of Pythium Leak in Postharvest Stored Potato Tubers Using Field Asymmetric Ion Mobility Spectrometry. Sensors 2020, 20, 7350. https://doi.org/10.3390/s20247350

AMA Style

Kothawade GS, Sankaran S, Bates AA, Schroeder BK, Khot LR. Feasibility of Volatile Biomarker-Based Detection of Pythium Leak in Postharvest Stored Potato Tubers Using Field Asymmetric Ion Mobility Spectrometry. Sensors. 2020; 20(24):7350. https://doi.org/10.3390/s20247350

Chicago/Turabian Style

Kothawade, Gajanan S., Sindhuja Sankaran, Austin A. Bates, Brenda K. Schroeder, and Lav R. Khot. 2020. "Feasibility of Volatile Biomarker-Based Detection of Pythium Leak in Postharvest Stored Potato Tubers Using Field Asymmetric Ion Mobility Spectrometry" Sensors 20, no. 24: 7350. https://doi.org/10.3390/s20247350

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