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Airborne and Terrestrial Observations of the Thermal Environment of Urban Areas Surrounding a High-Rise Building during the Japanese Winter

by 1,2, 1,3 and 1,*
1
School of Environment and Society, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259-G5-2, Nagatsuta-cho, Midori-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 226-8502, Japan
2
Center for Global Environmental Research, National Institute for Environmental Studies, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8506, Japan
3
Tongji Architectural Design (Group) Co., Ltd., No. 1230, Siping Road, Shanghai 200092, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sensors 2020, 20(2), 517; https://doi.org/10.3390/s20020517
Received: 6 December 2019 / Revised: 10 January 2020 / Accepted: 14 January 2020 / Published: 16 January 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Remote Sensors)
We investigated the distribution of air temperature (Ta) and the factors affecting it in low-rise areas surrounding an isolated high-rise building during the Japanese winter. The study site was the central part of a regional city in Japan (36°5′ N, 140°12′ E), lying north-east of the Tokyo metropolitan area. The daytime surface temperature (Ts) in the shade is generally considered to be comparable to Ta; however, according to airborne remote sensing conducted in December 2009 where a multi-spectral scanner was installed on a fixed-wing aircraft, Ts for pavements in the shade of a high-rise building was significantly lower than Ta of sub-urban areas, indicating an influence of cold storage on Ts. Then, we conducted mobile observations using instruments (thermocouple, four component radiometer, and so on) installed on a bicycle in January 2016 to investigate the detailed distribution of Ta and the factors affecting it. The results showed the Ta over the pavements in the shade of the high-rise building was lower than the Ta of sunlit areas in the same urban area by −2 °C and lower than the Ta of sub-urban areas by −1–1.5 °C, although the advection effect was large due to strong winds around the building. In conclusion, a locally lower Ta compared to the surrounding areas can develop during the day in winter, even in spaces that are open to areas beyond the canopy. View Full-Text
Keywords: urban thermal environment; air temperature; high-rise building; mobile observation; thermal remote sensing urban thermal environment; air temperature; high-rise building; mobile observation; thermal remote sensing
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MDPI and ACS Style

Oshio, H.; Chen, K.; Asawa, T. Airborne and Terrestrial Observations of the Thermal Environment of Urban Areas Surrounding a High-Rise Building during the Japanese Winter. Sensors 2020, 20, 517. https://doi.org/10.3390/s20020517

AMA Style

Oshio H, Chen K, Asawa T. Airborne and Terrestrial Observations of the Thermal Environment of Urban Areas Surrounding a High-Rise Building during the Japanese Winter. Sensors. 2020; 20(2):517. https://doi.org/10.3390/s20020517

Chicago/Turabian Style

Oshio, Haruki, Kan Chen, and Takashi Asawa. 2020. "Airborne and Terrestrial Observations of the Thermal Environment of Urban Areas Surrounding a High-Rise Building during the Japanese Winter" Sensors 20, no. 2: 517. https://doi.org/10.3390/s20020517

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