Next Article in Journal
Impact of Trunk Resistance and Stretching Exercise on Fall-Related Factors in Patients with Parkinson’s Disease: A Randomized Controlled Pilot Study
Next Article in Special Issue
Irradiance Sensing through PV Devices: A Sensitivity Analysis
Previous Article in Journal
Protecting Physical Communications in 5G C-RAN Architectures through Resonant Mechanisms in Optical Media
Previous Article in Special Issue
Experimental Application of Methods to Compute Solar Irradiance and Cell Temperature of Photovoltaic Modules
Article

Solar Blue Light Radiation Enhancement during Mid to Low Solar Elevation Periods under Cloud Affected Skies

1
Faculty of Health, Engineering and Sciences, University of Southern Queensland, Toowoomba 4350, Australia
2
Centre for Applied Climate Sciences, University of Southern Queensland, Toowoomba 4350, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sensors 2020, 20(15), 4105; https://doi.org/10.3390/s20154105
Received: 18 June 2020 / Revised: 13 July 2020 / Accepted: 22 July 2020 / Published: 23 July 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Solar Irradiance Sensors)
Solar blue-violet wavelengths (380−455 nm) are at the high energy end of the visible spectrum; referred to as “high energy visible” (HEV). Both chronic and acute exposure to these wavelengths has been often highlighted as a cause for concern with respect to ocular health. The sun is the source of HEV which reaches the Earth’s surface either directly or after scattering by the atmosphere and clouds. This research has investigated the effect of clouds on HEV for low solar elevation (solar zenith angles between 60° and 80°), simulating time periods when the opportunity for ocular exposure in global populations with office jobs is high during the early morning and late afternoon. The enhancement of “bluing” of the sky due to the influence of clouds was found to increase significantly with the amount of cloud. A method is presented for calculating HEV irradiance at sub-tropical latitudes from the more commonly measured global solar radiation (300–3000 nm) for all cases when clouds do and do not obscure the sun. The method; when applied to global solar radiation data correlates well with measured HEV within the solar zenith angle range 60° and 80° (R2 = 0.82; mean bias error (MBE) = −1.62%, mean absolute bias error (MABE) = 10.3% and root mean square error (RMSE) = 14.6%). The technique can be used to develop repeatable HEV hazard evaluations for human ocular health applications View Full-Text
Keywords: cloud modification factor; visible radiation; instrumentation; high energy visible; blue light cloud modification factor; visible radiation; instrumentation; high energy visible; blue light
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Parisi, A.V.; Igoe, D.P.; Amar, A.; Downs, N.J. Solar Blue Light Radiation Enhancement during Mid to Low Solar Elevation Periods under Cloud Affected Skies. Sensors 2020, 20, 4105. https://doi.org/10.3390/s20154105

AMA Style

Parisi AV, Igoe DP, Amar A, Downs NJ. Solar Blue Light Radiation Enhancement during Mid to Low Solar Elevation Periods under Cloud Affected Skies. Sensors. 2020; 20(15):4105. https://doi.org/10.3390/s20154105

Chicago/Turabian Style

Parisi, Alfio V., Damien P. Igoe, Abdurazaq Amar, and Nathan J. Downs 2020. "Solar Blue Light Radiation Enhancement during Mid to Low Solar Elevation Periods under Cloud Affected Skies" Sensors 20, no. 15: 4105. https://doi.org/10.3390/s20154105

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop