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Article

A Wearable Body Controlling Device for Application of Functional Electrical Stimulation

1
Department of Mechanical Engineering and Virtual Reality Applications Center, Iowa State University of Science and Technology, Ames, IA 50011, USA
2
Department of Veterinary Medicine & Biological Science, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843, USA
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sensors 2018, 18(4), 1251; https://doi.org/10.3390/s18041251
Received: 5 March 2018 / Revised: 14 April 2018 / Accepted: 17 April 2018 / Published: 18 April 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wearable Smart Devices)
In this research, we describe a new balancing device used to stabilize the rear quarters of a patient dog with spinal cord injuries. Our approach uses inertial measurement sensing and direct leg actuation to lay a foundation for eventual muscle control by means of direct functional electrical stimulation (FES). During this phase of development, we designed and built a mechanical test-bed to develop the control and stimulation algorithms before we use the device on our animal subjects. We designed the bionic test-bed to mimic the typical walking gait of a dog and use it to develop and test the functionality of the balancing device for stabilization of patient dogs with hindquarter paralysis. We present analysis for various muscle stimulation and balancing strategies, and our device can be used by veterinarians to tailor the stimulation strength and temporal distribution for any individual patient dog. We develop stabilizing muscle stimulation strategies using the robotic test-bed to enhance walking stability. We present experimental results using the bionic test-bed to demonstrate that the balancing device can provide an effective sensing strategy and deliver the required motion control commands for stabilizing an actual dog with a spinal cord injury. View Full-Text
Keywords: functional electrical stimulation; spinal cord injuries; bionic test-bed; balancing device functional electrical stimulation; spinal cord injuries; bionic test-bed; balancing device
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MDPI and ACS Style

Taghavi, N.; Luecke, G.R.; Jeffery, N.D. A Wearable Body Controlling Device for Application of Functional Electrical Stimulation. Sensors 2018, 18, 1251. https://doi.org/10.3390/s18041251

AMA Style

Taghavi N, Luecke GR, Jeffery ND. A Wearable Body Controlling Device for Application of Functional Electrical Stimulation. Sensors. 2018; 18(4):1251. https://doi.org/10.3390/s18041251

Chicago/Turabian Style

Taghavi, Nazita, Greg R. Luecke, and Nicholas D. Jeffery 2018. "A Wearable Body Controlling Device for Application of Functional Electrical Stimulation" Sensors 18, no. 4: 1251. https://doi.org/10.3390/s18041251

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