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Sensors 2018, 18(5), 1483; https://doi.org/10.3390/s18051483

Use of the Stockwell Transform in the Detection of P300 Evoked Potentials with Low-Cost Brain Sensors

1
Tecnológico Nacional de México-CENIDET, Interior Internado Palmira S/N, Col. Palmira, Cuernavaca, Morelos, C.P. 62490, México
2
Tecnológico Nacional de México-Instituto Tecnológico de Orizaba, Av. Oriente 9 N° 852, Col. Emiliano Zapata, Orizaba, C.P. 94320, México
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 23 February 2018 / Revised: 14 April 2018 / Accepted: 21 April 2018 / Published: 9 May 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wearable Smart Devices)
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Abstract

The evoked potential is a neuronal activity that originates when a stimulus is presented. To achieve its detection, various techniques of brain signal processing can be used. One of the most studied evoked potentials is the P300 brain wave, which usually appears between 300 and 500 ms after the stimulus. Currently, the detection of P300 evoked potentials is of great importance due to its unique properties that allow the development of applications such as spellers, lie detectors, and diagnosis of psychiatric disorders. The present study was developed to demonstrate the usefulness of the Stockwell transform in the process of identifying P300 evoked potentials using a low-cost electroencephalography (EEG) device with only two brain sensors. The acquisition of signals was carried out using the Emotiv EPOC® device—a wireless EEG headset. In the feature extraction, the Stockwell transform was used to obtain time-frequency information. The algorithms of linear discriminant analysis and a support vector machine were used in the classification process. The experiments were carried out with 10 participants; men with an average age of 25.3 years in good health. In general, a good performance (75–92%) was obtained in identifying P300 evoked potentials. View Full-Text
Keywords: P300 evoked potentials; Stockwell transform; electroencephalograph; brain-computer interface; non-invasive brain sensors; signals processing; wireless device P300 evoked potentials; Stockwell transform; electroencephalograph; brain-computer interface; non-invasive brain sensors; signals processing; wireless device
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
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Pérez-Vidal, A.F.; Garcia-Beltran, C.D.; Martínez-Sibaja, A.; Posada-Gómez, R. Use of the Stockwell Transform in the Detection of P300 Evoked Potentials with Low-Cost Brain Sensors. Sensors 2018, 18, 1483.

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