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Open AccessArticle

Geometric Correction for the Geostationary Ocean Color Imager from a Combination of Shoreline Matching and Frequency Matching

1
3DLabs Co. Ltd., 100 Inharo, Michuhol-Gu, Incheon 22212, Korea
2
Department of Geoinformatic Engineering, Inha University, 100 Inharo, Michuhol-Gu, Incheon 22212, Korea
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sensors 2018, 18(11), 3599; https://doi.org/10.3390/s18113599
Received: 4 September 2018 / Revised: 11 October 2018 / Accepted: 22 October 2018 / Published: 23 October 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Remote Sensing of Ocean Colour: Theory and Applications)
Geometric correction is fundamental in producing high quality satellite data products. However, the geometric correction for ocean color sensors, e.g., Geostationary Ocean Color Imager (GOCI), is challenging because the traditional method based on ground control points (GCPs) cannot be applied when the shoreline is absent. In this study, we develop a hybrid geometric correction method, which applies shoreline matching and frequency matching on slots with shorelines and without shorelines, respectively. Frequency matching has been proposed to estimate the relative orientation between GOCI slots without a shoreline. In this paper, we extend our earlier research for absolute orientation and geometric correction by combining frequency matching results with shoreline matching ones. The proposed method consists of four parts: Initial sensor modeling of slots without shorelines, precise sensor modeling through shoreline matching, relative orientation modeling by frequency matching, and generation of geometric correction results using a combination of the two matching procedures. Initial sensor modeling uses the sensor model equation for GOCI and metadata in order to remove geometric distortion due to the Earth’s rotation and curvature in the slots without shorelines. Precise sensor modeling is performed with shoreline matching and random sample consensus (RANSAC) in the slots with shorelines. Frequency matching computes position shifts for slots without shorelines with respect to the precisely corrected slots with shorelines. GOCI Level 1B scenes are generated by combining the results from shoreline matching and frequency matching. We analyzed the accuracy of shoreline matching alone against that of the combination of shoreline matching and frequency matching. Both methods yielded a similar accuracy of 1.2 km, which supports the idea that frequency matching can replace traditional shoreline matching for slots without visible shorelines. View Full-Text
Keywords: GOCI; geometric correction; sensor modeling; shoreline matching; frequency matching GOCI; geometric correction; sensor modeling; shoreline matching; frequency matching
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Kim, H.-G.; Son, J.-H.; Kim, T. Geometric Correction for the Geostationary Ocean Color Imager from a Combination of Shoreline Matching and Frequency Matching. Sensors 2018, 18, 3599.

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