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Diversity Best Paper Awards for 2015
Open AccessArticle

Multiple Paternity and Preliminary Population Genetics of Giant Pacific Octopuses, Enteroctopus dofleini, in Oregon, Washington and the Southeast Coast of Vancouver Island, BC

by Shawn Larson 1,*, Catherine Ramsay 1,† and James A. Cosgrove 2,†,‡
1
Research Department, Life Sciences Division, Seattle Aquarium, Seattle, Washington 98101, USA
2
Natural History Section, Royal British Columbia Museum, Victoria, BC V8W 9W2, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this work.
Retired.
Academic Editor: Michael Wink
Diversity 2015, 7(2), 195-205; https://doi.org/10.3390/d7020195
Received: 10 April 2015 / Revised: 30 May 2015 / Accepted: 11 June 2015 / Published: 17 June 2015
A total of 77 giant Pacific octopus, Enteroctopus dofleini, tissue samples were collected from the Oregon Coast (OR), Neah Bay Washington (NB), Puget Sound Washington (PS) and the southeast coast of Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada (BC) for genetic analyses. A suite of eight variable microsatellite markers developed from giant Pacific octopuses were amplified in these samples to determine population diversity, structure, relatedness and paternity. The majority of loci met Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium expectations within each population. We found moderate genetic diversity (average observed heterozygosity = 0.445, range = 0.307–0.515 and average expected heterozygosity = 0.567, range = 0.506–0.696) and moderate population structuring with distinct separation of groups (FST values ranged from 0.101 between BC and PS to 0.237 between BC and NB). Several egg strings from the BC population were collected from three female octopus dens for relatedness and paternity analyses. Results suggest strong support for multiple paternity within one egg clutch with progeny sired by between two to four males. View Full-Text
Keywords: Cephalpods; giant Pacific octopus; population genetics; microsatellites; polyandry; multiple paternity Cephalpods; giant Pacific octopus; population genetics; microsatellites; polyandry; multiple paternity
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Larson, S.; Ramsay, C.; Cosgrove, J.A. Multiple Paternity and Preliminary Population Genetics of Giant Pacific Octopuses, Enteroctopus dofleini, in Oregon, Washington and the Southeast Coast of Vancouver Island, BC. Diversity 2015, 7, 195-205.

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