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Concept Paper

Citizens, Scientists, and Enablers: A Tripartite Model for Citizen Science Projects

1
Centre for Science in Society, Te Herenga Waka, Victoria University of Wellington, Wellington 6140, New Zealand
2
Te Pūnaha Matatini Centre of Research Excellence, University of Auckland, Auckland 1142, New Zealand
3
Centre for Biodiversity and Restoration Ecology, School of Biological Sciences, Te Herenga Waka, Victoria University of Wellington, Wellington 6140, New Zealand
4
Wellington City Council, Wellington 6140, New Zealand
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Michael Wink, John A. Cigliano, Tina Phillips, Elizabeth R. Ellwood, Amanda E. Sorensen and Monica Awasthy
Diversity 2021, 13(7), 309; https://doi.org/10.3390/d13070309
Received: 17 April 2021 / Revised: 25 June 2021 / Accepted: 4 July 2021 / Published: 8 July 2021
In this paper, we focus on different roles in citizen science projects, and their respective relationships. We propose a tripartite model that recognises not only citizens and scientists, but also an important third role, which we call the ‘enabler’. In doing so, we acknowledge that additional expertise and skillsets are often present in citizen science projects, but are frequently overlooked in associated literature. We interrogate this model by applying it to three case studies and explore how the success and sustainability of a citizen science project requires all roles to be acknowledged and interacting appropriately. In this era of ‘wicked problems’, the nature of science and science communication has become more complex. In order to address critical emerging issues, a greater number of stakeholders are engaging in multi-party partnerships and research is becoming increasingly interdisciplinary. Within this context, explicitly acknowledging the role and motivations of everyone involved can provide a framework for enhanced project transparency, delivery, evaluation and impact. By adapting our understanding of citizen science to better recognise the complexity of the organisational systems within which they operate, we propose an opportunity to strengthen the collaborative delivery of both valuable scientific research and public engagement. View Full-Text
Keywords: advocacy; biodiversity; conservation biology; citizen science; Great Kererū Count; i-Naturalist; Lion Guardians; participatory science; public engagement with science; wicked problems advocacy; biodiversity; conservation biology; citizen science; Great Kererū Count; i-Naturalist; Lion Guardians; participatory science; public engagement with science; wicked problems
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MDPI and ACS Style

Salmon, R.A.; Rammell, S.; Emeny, M.T.; Hartley, S. Citizens, Scientists, and Enablers: A Tripartite Model for Citizen Science Projects. Diversity 2021, 13, 309. https://doi.org/10.3390/d13070309

AMA Style

Salmon RA, Rammell S, Emeny MT, Hartley S. Citizens, Scientists, and Enablers: A Tripartite Model for Citizen Science Projects. Diversity. 2021; 13(7):309. https://doi.org/10.3390/d13070309

Chicago/Turabian Style

Salmon, Rhian A., Samuel Rammell, Myfanwy T. Emeny, and Stephen Hartley. 2021. "Citizens, Scientists, and Enablers: A Tripartite Model for Citizen Science Projects" Diversity 13, no. 7: 309. https://doi.org/10.3390/d13070309

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