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Article

Effects of Pure and Mixed Pine and Oak Forest Stands on Carabid Beetles

Department of Forest Sciences, Faculty of Environmental Sciences, Institute of Silviculture and Forest Protection, TU Dresden, 01737 Tharandt, Germany
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Academic Editor: Tibor Magura
Diversity 2021, 13(3), 127; https://doi.org/10.3390/d13030127
Received: 26 February 2021 / Revised: 11 March 2021 / Accepted: 13 March 2021 / Published: 17 March 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Faunistical and Ecological Studies on Carabid Beetles)
The multiple-use approach to forestry applied in Germany aims to combine timber production and habitat management by preserving specific stand structures. We selected four forest stand types comprising (i) pure oak, (ii) equal oak–pine mixtures, (iii) single tree admixtures of oak in pine forest and (iv) pure pine. We analysed the effects of stand composition parameters on species representative of the larger carabid beetles (Carabus arvensis, C. coriaceus, C. hortensis, C. violaceus, Calosoma inquisitor). The main statistical methods used were correlation analyses and generalised linear mixed models. Cal. inquisitor was observed in pure oak forests exclusively. C. coriaceus and C. hortensis were absent from pure pine stands. High activity densities of C. arvensis and C. violaceus were observed in all four forest types. When assessed at the smaller scales of species crown cover proportions and spatial tree species effect zones, C. hortensis was found to be positively related to oak trees with a regular spatial distribution, whereas C. coriaceus preferred lower and more aggregated oak tree proportions. C. violaceus showed strong sex-specific tree species affinities. Information about preferences of carabid beetles is necessary for management activities targeting the adaptation of forest structures to habitat requirements. View Full-Text
Keywords: mixed forests; Carabidae; activity density; body size; sex ratio; aggregation index; spatial effect zones mixed forests; Carabidae; activity density; body size; sex ratio; aggregation index; spatial effect zones
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MDPI and ACS Style

Wehnert, A.; Wagner, S.; Huth, F. Effects of Pure and Mixed Pine and Oak Forest Stands on Carabid Beetles. Diversity 2021, 13, 127. https://doi.org/10.3390/d13030127

AMA Style

Wehnert A, Wagner S, Huth F. Effects of Pure and Mixed Pine and Oak Forest Stands on Carabid Beetles. Diversity. 2021; 13(3):127. https://doi.org/10.3390/d13030127

Chicago/Turabian Style

Wehnert, Alexandra, Sven Wagner, and Franka Huth. 2021. "Effects of Pure and Mixed Pine and Oak Forest Stands on Carabid Beetles" Diversity 13, no. 3: 127. https://doi.org/10.3390/d13030127

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