Next Article in Journal
Cryptic Clitellata: Molecular Species Delimitation of Clitellate Worms (Annelida): An Overview
Next Article in Special Issue
Flock Size Predicts Niche Breadth and Focal Wintering Regions for a Rapidly Declining Boreal-Breeding Passerine, the Rusty Blackbird
Previous Article in Journal
Ethanol eDNA Reveals Unique Community Composition of Aquatic Macroinvertebrates Compared to Bulk Tissue Metabarcoding in a Biomonitoring Sampling Scheme
Previous Article in Special Issue
Assessment of Rusty Blackbird Habitat Occupancy in the Long Range Mountains of Newfoundland, Canada Using Forest Inventory Data
Open AccessArticle

Occupancy of the American Three-Toed Woodpecker in a Heavily-Managed Boreal Forest of Eastern Canada

1
Science and Technology Branch, Environment and Climate Change Canada, 1550 Avenue d’Estimauville, Québec, QC G1J 0C3, Canada
2
Département des Sciences du Bois et de la Forêt, Université Laval, 2405 rue de la Terrasse, Québec, QC G1V 0A6, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Diversity 2021, 13(1), 35; https://doi.org/10.3390/d13010035
Received: 17 December 2020 / Revised: 13 January 2021 / Accepted: 15 January 2021 / Published: 19 January 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Boreal Bird Ecology, Management and Conservation)
The southern extent of the boreal forest in North America has experienced intensive human disturbance in recent decades. Among these, forest harvesting leads to the substantial loss of late-successional stands that include key habitat attributes for several avian species. The American Three-toed Woodpecker, Picoides dorsalis, is associated with continuous old spruce forests in the eastern part of its range. In this study, we assessed the influence of habitat characteristics at different scales on the occupancy of American Three-toed Woodpecker in a heavily-managed boreal landscape of northeastern Canada, and we inferred species occupancy at the regional scale. We conducted 185 playback stations over two breeding seasons and modelled the occupancy of the species while taking into account the probability of detection. American Three-toed Woodpecker occupancy was lower in stands with large areas recently clear-cut, and higher in landscapes with large extents of old-growth forest dominated by black spruce. At the regional scale, areas with high probability of occupancy were scarce and mostly within protected areas. Habitat requirements of the American Three-toed Woodpecker during the breeding season, coupled with overall low occupancy rate in our study area, challenge its long-term sustainability in such heavily managed landscapes. Additionally, the scarcity of areas of high probability of occupancy in the region suggests that the ecological role of old forest outside protected areas could be compromised. View Full-Text
Keywords: boreal forest; clear-cutting; conservation; forest management; old-growth forest; Picoides dorsalis; protected areas boreal forest; clear-cutting; conservation; forest management; old-growth forest; Picoides dorsalis; protected areas
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Lamarre, V.; Tremblay, J.A. Occupancy of the American Three-Toed Woodpecker in a Heavily-Managed Boreal Forest of Eastern Canada. Diversity 2021, 13, 35. https://doi.org/10.3390/d13010035

AMA Style

Lamarre V, Tremblay JA. Occupancy of the American Three-Toed Woodpecker in a Heavily-Managed Boreal Forest of Eastern Canada. Diversity. 2021; 13(1):35. https://doi.org/10.3390/d13010035

Chicago/Turabian Style

Lamarre, Vincent; Tremblay, Junior A. 2021. "Occupancy of the American Three-Toed Woodpecker in a Heavily-Managed Boreal Forest of Eastern Canada" Diversity 13, no. 1: 35. https://doi.org/10.3390/d13010035

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop