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Article

Plant-Pollinator Networks in Savannas of Burkina Faso, West Africa

1
Department of Botany and Botanical Garden, Institute of Biological Sciences, University of Rostock, Wismarsche Strasse 44-45, 18051 Rostock, Germany
2
Unité de Formation et de Recherche des Sciences Biologiques, Département de Biologie Animale, Université Peleforo Gon Coulibaly de Korhogo, Korhogo B.P. 1328, Cote d’Ivoire
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Laboratoire de Biologie et Ecologie Végétales (La.BEV), Université Joseph Ki-Zerbo, Ouagadougou 03 BP 7021, Burkina Faso
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Biocenter, Department of Animal Ecology and Tropical Biology, University of Wuerzburg, Am Hubland, D-97074 Würzburg, Germany
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Centre for Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation (CliMA), University of Kassel, Kurt-Schumacher-Straße 25, D-34117 Kassel, Germany
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Grassland Science and Renewable Plant Resources (GNR), University of Kassel, Steinstrasse 19, D-37213 Witzenhausen, Germany
7
General Zoology, Institute for Biology, Martin-Luther University Halle-Wittenberg, Hoher Weg 8, 06120 Halle (Saale), Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Diversity 2021, 13(1), 1; https://doi.org/10.3390/d13010001
Received: 30 October 2020 / Revised: 7 December 2020 / Accepted: 18 December 2020 / Published: 22 December 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Land-Use and Climate Impacts on Plant-Pollinator Interactions)
West African savannas are severely threatened with intensified land use and increasing degradation. Bees are important for terrestrial biodiversity as they provide native plant species with pollination services. However, little information is available regarding their mutualistic interactions with woody plant species. In the first network study from sub-Saharan West Africa, we investigated the effects of land-use intensity and climatic seasonality on plant–bee communities and their interaction networks. In total, we recorded 5686 interactions between 53 flowering woody plant species and 100 bee species. Bee-species richness and the number of interactions were higher in the low compared to medium and high land-use intensity sites. Bee- and plant-species richness and the number of interactions were higher in the dry compared to the rainy season. Plant–bee visitation networks were not strongly affected by land-use intensity; however, climatic seasonality had a strong effect on network architecture. Null-model corrected connectance and nestedness were higher in the dry compared to the rainy season. In addition, network specialization and null-model corrected modularity were lower in the dry compared to the rainy season. Our results suggest that in our study region, seasonal effects on mutualistic network architecture are more pronounced compared to land-use change effects. Nonetheless, the decrease in bee-species richness and the number of plant–bee interactions with an increase in land-use intensity highlights the importance of savanna conservation for maintaining bee diversity and the concomitant provision of ecosystem services. View Full-Text
Keywords: bees; community composition; connectance; land-use intensity; modularity; mutualism; number of interactions; seasonality; woody plant richness bees; community composition; connectance; land-use intensity; modularity; mutualism; number of interactions; seasonality; woody plant richness
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MDPI and ACS Style

Stein, K.; Coulibaly, D.; Balima, L.H.; Goetze, D.; Linsenmair, K.E.; Porembski, S.; Stenchly, K.; Theodorou, P. Plant-Pollinator Networks in Savannas of Burkina Faso, West Africa. Diversity 2021, 13, 1. https://doi.org/10.3390/d13010001

AMA Style

Stein K, Coulibaly D, Balima LH, Goetze D, Linsenmair KE, Porembski S, Stenchly K, Theodorou P. Plant-Pollinator Networks in Savannas of Burkina Faso, West Africa. Diversity. 2021; 13(1):1. https://doi.org/10.3390/d13010001

Chicago/Turabian Style

Stein, Katharina, Drissa Coulibaly, Larba H. Balima, Dethardt Goetze, Karl E. Linsenmair, Stefan Porembski, Kathrin Stenchly, and Panagiotis Theodorou. 2021. "Plant-Pollinator Networks in Savannas of Burkina Faso, West Africa" Diversity 13, no. 1: 1. https://doi.org/10.3390/d13010001

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