Next Article in Journal
Dark Septate Endophytic Fungi Associated with Sugarcane Plants Cultivated in São Paulo, Brazil
Next Article in Special Issue
Lack of Cascading Effects of Eurasian Lynx Predation on Roe Deer to Soil and Plant Nutrients
Previous Article in Journal
Tuber mesentericum and Tuber aestivum Truffles: New Insights Based on Morphological and Phylogenetic Analyses
Article

Caching Behavior of Large Prey by Eurasian Lynx: Quantifying the Anti-Scavenging Benefits

1
Norwegian Institute for Nature Research, NO-7485 Trondheim, Norway
2
Norwegian Institute for Nature Research, Sognsveien 68, NO-0855 Oslo, Norway
3
Queen Maud University College for Early Childhood Education, Thrond Nergaards veg 7, 7044 Trondheim, Norway
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Present address: Saghaugen gård, Skjomdalveien-Bogholm 21, 8523 Skjomen, Norway.
Diversity 2020, 12(9), 350; https://doi.org/10.3390/d12090350
Received: 27 July 2020 / Revised: 7 September 2020 / Accepted: 10 September 2020 / Published: 13 September 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ecology of Predation and Scavenging and the Interface)
Large solitary felids often kill large prey items that can provide multiple meals. However, being able to utilize these multiple meals requires that they can cache the meat in a manner that delays its discovery by vertebrate and invertebrate scavengers. Covering the kill with vegetation and snow is a commonly observed strategy among felids. This study investigates the utility of this strategy using observational data from Eurasian lynx (Lynx lynx)-killed roe deer (Capreolus capreolus) carcasses, and a set of two experiments focused on vertebrate and invertebrate scavengers, respectively. Lynx-killed roe deer that were covered by snow or vegetation were less likely to have been visited by scavengers. Experimentally-deployed video-monitored roe deer carcasses had significantly longer time prior to discovery by avian scavengers when covered with vegetation. Carcass parts placed in cages that excluded vertebrate scavengers had delayed invertebrate activity when covered with vegetation. All three datasets indicated that covering a kill was a successful caching/anti-scavenger strategy. These results can help explain why lynx functional responses reach plateaus at relatively low kill rates. The success of this anti-scavenging behavior therefore has clear effects on the dynamics of a predator–prey system. View Full-Text
Keywords: caching; Capreolus capreolus; carrion; Eurasian lynx; Lynx lynx; Norway; predation; roe deer; scavenging caching; Capreolus capreolus; carrion; Eurasian lynx; Lynx lynx; Norway; predation; roe deer; scavenging
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

MDPI and ACS Style

Teurlings, I.J.M.; Odden, J.; Linnell, J.D.C.; Melis, C. Caching Behavior of Large Prey by Eurasian Lynx: Quantifying the Anti-Scavenging Benefits. Diversity 2020, 12, 350. https://doi.org/10.3390/d12090350

AMA Style

Teurlings IJM, Odden J, Linnell JDC, Melis C. Caching Behavior of Large Prey by Eurasian Lynx: Quantifying the Anti-Scavenging Benefits. Diversity. 2020; 12(9):350. https://doi.org/10.3390/d12090350

Chicago/Turabian Style

Teurlings, Ivonne J.M., John Odden, John D.C. Linnell, and Claudia Melis. 2020. "Caching Behavior of Large Prey by Eurasian Lynx: Quantifying the Anti-Scavenging Benefits" Diversity 12, no. 9: 350. https://doi.org/10.3390/d12090350

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop