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Communication

Rotating Arrays of Orchid Flowers: A Simple and Effective Method for Studying Pollination in Food Deceptive Plants

1
School of Molecular and Life Sciences, Curtin University, Bentley, WA 6102, Australia
2
Department of Biology, University of Naples Federico II, 80126 Naples, Italy
3
Department of Biodiversity and Attractions, Conservation Kings Park Science, Perth, WA 6005, Australia
4
Dipartimento di Biotecnologie e Bioscienze, Università degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, 20126 Milano, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Diversity 2020, 12(8), 286; https://doi.org/10.3390/d12080286
Received: 27 May 2020 / Revised: 16 July 2020 / Accepted: 19 July 2020 / Published: 22 July 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Ecology and Diversity of Orchids)
Floral deception has been observed in several genera in angiosperms, but is most common in the Orchidaceae. Pollination mechanisms in food deceptive plants are often difficult to assess, as visitation frequency by insects requires numerous hours of field observations to ascertain. Here, for the first time, we describe in detail and validate a simple and effective method that extends previous approaches to increase the effectiveness of pollination studies of food deceptive orchids. We used an orchid of southwest Australia, Diuris brumalis (Orchidaceae), that visually mimics model plants belonging to the genus Daviesia (Faboideae). Arrays of orchid flowers were placed and moved systematically in proximity to model plants, resulting in rapid attraction of the pollinators of D. brumalis. We compared pollinaria removal (as an indicator of pollination success) in naturally growing orchids with pollinaria removal in arrays of orchid flowers in the same sites. We showed that the proposed method greatly enhances pollinator attractiveness in food deceptive systems with very low pollination rates, and we compared its efficiency with other similar methods. The approach can be used for observing pollinator behavioural patterns and confirming effective pollinators for food deceptive species with low insect visitation rates. View Full-Text
Keywords: bait orchids; food deception; pollinator attraction; pollinator observation bait orchids; food deception; pollinator attraction; pollinator observation
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MDPI and ACS Style

Scaccabarozzi, D.; Galimberti, A.; Dixon, K.W.; Cozzolino, S. Rotating Arrays of Orchid Flowers: A Simple and Effective Method for Studying Pollination in Food Deceptive Plants. Diversity 2020, 12, 286. https://doi.org/10.3390/d12080286

AMA Style

Scaccabarozzi D, Galimberti A, Dixon KW, Cozzolino S. Rotating Arrays of Orchid Flowers: A Simple and Effective Method for Studying Pollination in Food Deceptive Plants. Diversity. 2020; 12(8):286. https://doi.org/10.3390/d12080286

Chicago/Turabian Style

Scaccabarozzi, Daniela, Andrea Galimberti, Kingsley W. Dixon, and Salvatore Cozzolino. 2020. "Rotating Arrays of Orchid Flowers: A Simple and Effective Method for Studying Pollination in Food Deceptive Plants" Diversity 12, no. 8: 286. https://doi.org/10.3390/d12080286

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