Next Article in Journal
Current State and Drivers of Arable Plant Diversity in Conventionally Managed Farmland in Northwest Germany
Next Article in Special Issue
Disentangling the Genetic Relationships of Three Closely Related Bandicoot Species across Southern and Western Australia
Previous Article in Journal
Reproduction in Urbanised Coastal Waters: Shallow-Water Sea Anemones (Entacmaea quadricolor and Stichodactyla haddoni) Maintain High Genetic Diversity and Panmixia
Previous Article in Special Issue
Genetic Consequences of Multiple Translocations of the Banded Hare-Wallaby in Western Australia
Article

Genomic Screening Reveals That the Endangered Eucalyptus paludicola (Myrtaceae) Is a Hybrid

1
School of Biological Sciences, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA 5005, Australia
2
Department for Environment and Water, Botanic Gardens and State Herbarium, State Herbarium of South Australia, Adelaide, SA 5001, Australia
3
Department for Environment and Water, Government of South Australia, Adelaide, SA 5001, Australia
4
Tasmanian Land Conservancy, Lower Sandy Bay, TAS 7005, Australia
5
Department of Anatomy, University of Otago, Dunedin 9054, New Zealand
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Diversity 2020, 12(12), 468; https://doi.org/10.3390/d12120468
Received: 12 November 2020 / Revised: 1 December 2020 / Accepted: 7 December 2020 / Published: 10 December 2020
A hybrid origin for a conservation listed taxon will influence its status and management options. Here, we investigate the genetic origins of a nationally endangered listed taxon—Eucalyptus paludicola—a tree that is restricted to the Fleurieu Peninsula and Kangaroo Island of South Australia. Since its description in 1995, there have been suggestions that this taxon may potentially be a stable hybrid species. Using a high throughput sequencing approach, we developed a panel of polymorphic loci that were screened across E. paludicola and its putative parental species E. cosmophylla and E. ovata. Bayesian clustering of the genotype data identified separate groups comprising E. ovata and E. cosmophylla while E. paludicola individuals were admixed between these two, consistent with a hybrid origin. Hybrid class assignment tests indicate that the majority of E. paludicola individuals (~70%) are F1 hybrids with a low incidence of backcrossing. Most of the post-F1 hybrids were associated with revegetation sites suggesting they may be maladapted and rarely reach maturity under natural conditions. These data support the hypothesis that E. paludicola is a transient hybrid entity rather than a distinct hybrid species. We briefly discuss the conservation implications of our findings. View Full-Text
Keywords: conservation; natural hybridisation; Eucalyptus; high throughput sequencing; NGS; South Australia conservation; natural hybridisation; Eucalyptus; high throughput sequencing; NGS; South Australia
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

van Dijk, K.-j.; Waycott, M.; Quarmby, J.; Bickerton, D.; Thornhill, A.H.; Cross, H.; Biffin, E. Genomic Screening Reveals That the Endangered Eucalyptus paludicola (Myrtaceae) Is a Hybrid. Diversity 2020, 12, 468. https://doi.org/10.3390/d12120468

AMA Style

van Dijk K-j, Waycott M, Quarmby J, Bickerton D, Thornhill AH, Cross H, Biffin E. Genomic Screening Reveals That the Endangered Eucalyptus paludicola (Myrtaceae) Is a Hybrid. Diversity. 2020; 12(12):468. https://doi.org/10.3390/d12120468

Chicago/Turabian Style

van Dijk, Kor-jent, Michelle Waycott, Joe Quarmby, Doug Bickerton, Andrew H. Thornhill, Hugh Cross, and Edward Biffin. 2020. "Genomic Screening Reveals That the Endangered Eucalyptus paludicola (Myrtaceae) Is a Hybrid" Diversity 12, no. 12: 468. https://doi.org/10.3390/d12120468

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop