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Review

The Effect of Body Mass Index on Melanoma Biology, Immunotherapy Efficacy, and Clinical Outcomes: A Narrative Review

Department of Dermatology, University Hospitals Leuven, 3000 Leuven, Belgium
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Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2024, 25(12), 6433; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms25126433
Submission received: 29 April 2024 / Revised: 6 June 2024 / Accepted: 8 June 2024 / Published: 11 June 2024
(This article belongs to the Section Molecular Pathology, Diagnostics, and Therapeutics)

Abstract

Recent studies indicate that a higher body mass index (BMI) might correlate with improved responses to melanoma treatment, especially with immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICIs), despite the general association of obesity with an increased risk of cancer and higher mortality rates. This review examines the paradoxical relationship between BMI and clinical outcomes in melanoma patients by exploring molecular links, the efficacy of immunotherapy, and patient survival outcomes. Our comprehensive literature search across the PubMed and Embase databases revealed a consistent pattern: increased BMI is associated with a better prognosis in melanoma patients undergoing ICI treatment. This “obesity paradox” might be explained by the metabolic and immunological changes in obesity, which could enhance the effectiveness of immunotherapy in treating melanoma. The findings highlight the complexity of the interactions between obesity and melanoma, suggesting that adipose tissue may modulate the immune response and treatment sensitivity favorably. Our review highlights the need for personalized treatment strategies that consider the metabolic profiles of patients and calls for further research to validate BMI as a prognostic factor in clinical settings. This nuanced approach to the obesity paradox in melanoma could significantly impact treatment planning and patient management.
Keywords: obesity paradox; body mass index; melanoma biology; immune checkpoint inhibitors; prognosis; survival obesity paradox; body mass index; melanoma biology; immune checkpoint inhibitors; prognosis; survival

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MDPI and ACS Style

Jansen, J.; Garmyn, M.; Güvenç, C. The Effect of Body Mass Index on Melanoma Biology, Immunotherapy Efficacy, and Clinical Outcomes: A Narrative Review. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2024, 25, 6433. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms25126433

AMA Style

Jansen J, Garmyn M, Güvenç C. The Effect of Body Mass Index on Melanoma Biology, Immunotherapy Efficacy, and Clinical Outcomes: A Narrative Review. International Journal of Molecular Sciences. 2024; 25(12):6433. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms25126433

Chicago/Turabian Style

Jansen, Jente, Marjan Garmyn, and Canan Güvenç. 2024. "The Effect of Body Mass Index on Melanoma Biology, Immunotherapy Efficacy, and Clinical Outcomes: A Narrative Review" International Journal of Molecular Sciences 25, no. 12: 6433. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms25126433

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