Next Article in Journal
Bladder Cancer Extracellular Vesicles Elicit a CD8 T Cell-Mediated Antitumor Immunity
Next Article in Special Issue
Molecular Mechanism of Induction of Bone Growth by the C-Type Natriuretic Peptide
Previous Article in Journal
Targeting Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1 with Metformin
Previous Article in Special Issue
Cellular and Molecular Alterations Underlying Abnormal Bone Growth in X-Linked Hypophosphatemia
 
 
Correction published on 27 May 2022, see Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2022, 23(11), 6020.
Article

Bone Mass and Osteoblast Activity Are Sex-Dependent in Mice Lacking the Estrogen Receptor α in Chondrocytes and Osteoblast Progenitor Cells

1
Institute of Orthopedic Research and Biomechanics, University Medical Center Ulm, 89081 Ulm, Germany
2
Institute of Comparative Molecular Endocrinology (CME), Ulm University, 89081 Ulm, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Giacomina Brunetti
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2022, 23(5), 2902; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms23052902
Received: 16 February 2022 / Revised: 3 March 2022 / Accepted: 4 March 2022 / Published: 7 March 2022 / Corrected: 27 May 2022
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bone Development and Growth)
While estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) is known to be important for bone development and homeostasis, its exact function during osteoblast differentiation remains unclear. Conditional deletion of ERα during specific stages of osteoblast differentiation revealed different bone phenotypes, which were also shown to be sex-dependent. Since hypertrophic chondrocytes can transdifferentiate into osteoblasts and substantially contribute to long-bone development, we aimed to investigate the effects of ERα deletion in both osteoblast and chondrocytes on bone development and structure. Therefore, we generated mice in which the ERα gene was inactivated via a Runx2-driven cyclic recombinase (ERαfl/fl; Runx2Cre). We analyzed the bones of 3-month-old ERαfl/fl; Runx2Cre mice by biomechanical testing, micro-computed tomography, and cellular parameters by histology. Male ERαfl/fl; Runx2Cre mice displayed a significantly increased cortical bone mass and flexural rigidity of the femurs compared to age-matched controls with no active Cre-transgene (ERαfl/fl). By contrast, female ERαfl/fl; Runx2Cre mice exhibited significant trabecular bone loss, whereas in cortical bone periosteal and endosteal diameters were reduced. Our results indicate that the ERα in osteoblast progenitors and hypertrophic chondrocytes differentially contributes to bone mass regulation in male and female mice and improves our understanding of ERα signaling in bone cells in vivo. View Full-Text
Keywords: bone; estrogen; receptor knockout; genetic animal model; sex steroids; osteoblasts; chondrocytes; biomechanics bone; estrogen; receptor knockout; genetic animal model; sex steroids; osteoblasts; chondrocytes; biomechanics
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Steppe, L.; Bülow, J.; Tuckermann, J.; Ignatius, A.; Haffner-Luntzer, M. Bone Mass and Osteoblast Activity Are Sex-Dependent in Mice Lacking the Estrogen Receptor α in Chondrocytes and Osteoblast Progenitor Cells. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2022, 23, 2902. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms23052902

AMA Style

Steppe L, Bülow J, Tuckermann J, Ignatius A, Haffner-Luntzer M. Bone Mass and Osteoblast Activity Are Sex-Dependent in Mice Lacking the Estrogen Receptor α in Chondrocytes and Osteoblast Progenitor Cells. International Journal of Molecular Sciences. 2022; 23(5):2902. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms23052902

Chicago/Turabian Style

Steppe, Lena, Jasmin Bülow, Jan Tuckermann, Anita Ignatius, and Melanie Haffner-Luntzer. 2022. "Bone Mass and Osteoblast Activity Are Sex-Dependent in Mice Lacking the Estrogen Receptor α in Chondrocytes and Osteoblast Progenitor Cells" International Journal of Molecular Sciences 23, no. 5: 2902. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms23052902

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop