Next Article in Journal
Mushroom-Derived Medicine? Preclinical Studies Suggest Potential Benefits of Ergothioneine for Cardiometabolic Health
Next Article in Special Issue
Hexokinase 2 in Cancer: A Prima Donna Playing Multiple Characters
Previous Article in Journal
Assessment of Amyloid Forming Tendency of Peptide Sequences from Amyloid Beta and Tau Proteins Using Force-Field, Semi-Empirical, and Density Functional Theory Calculations
Previous Article in Special Issue
Cardiolipin, the Mitochondrial Signature Lipid: Implication in Cancer
Review

Mitochondrial Transfer in Cancer: A Comprehensive Review

Pole of Pharmacology, Institut de Recherche Experimentale et Clinique (IREC), Université Catholique de Louvain (UCLouvain), Avenue Hippocrate 57 Box B1.57.04, 1200 Brussels, Belgium
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this work.
Current address: Department of Pharmacy and Biotechnology (FaBit), Alma Mater Studiorum-University of Bologna, Via Belmeloro 6, 40126 Bologna, Italy.
Academic Editor: Karel Smetana
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22(6), 3245; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms22063245
Received: 1 March 2021 / Revised: 19 March 2021 / Accepted: 20 March 2021 / Published: 23 March 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mitochondrial Functions, Alterations and Dynamics in Cancer)
Depending on their tissue of origin, genetic and epigenetic marks and microenvironmental influences, cancer cells cover a broad range of metabolic activities that fluctuate over time and space. At the core of most metabolic pathways, mitochondria are essential organelles that participate in energy and biomass production, act as metabolic sensors, control cancer cell death, and initiate signaling pathways related to cancer cell migration, invasion, metastasis and resistance to treatments. While some mitochondrial modifications provide aggressive advantages to cancer cells, others are detrimental. This comprehensive review summarizes the current knowledge about mitochondrial transfers that can occur between cancer and nonmalignant cells. Among different mechanisms comprising gap junctions and cell-cell fusion, tunneling nanotubes are increasingly recognized as a main intercellular platform for unidirectional and bidirectional mitochondrial exchanges. Understanding their structure and functionality is an important task expected to generate new anticancer approaches aimed at interfering with gains of functions (e.g., cancer cell proliferation, migration, invasion, metastasis and chemoresistance) or damaged mitochondria elimination associated with mitochondrial transfer. View Full-Text
Keywords: cancer; cancer metabolism; mitochondria; mitochondrial transfer; tunneling nanotubes (TNT); oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS); tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle; reactive oxygen species (ROS); metastasis; chemoresistance cancer; cancer metabolism; mitochondria; mitochondrial transfer; tunneling nanotubes (TNT); oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS); tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle; reactive oxygen species (ROS); metastasis; chemoresistance
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Zampieri, L.X.; Silva-Almeida, C.; Rondeau, J.D.; Sonveaux, P. Mitochondrial Transfer in Cancer: A Comprehensive Review. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22, 3245. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms22063245

AMA Style

Zampieri LX, Silva-Almeida C, Rondeau JD, Sonveaux P. Mitochondrial Transfer in Cancer: A Comprehensive Review. International Journal of Molecular Sciences. 2021; 22(6):3245. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms22063245

Chicago/Turabian Style

Zampieri, Luca X., Catarina Silva-Almeida, Justin D. Rondeau, and Pierre Sonveaux. 2021. "Mitochondrial Transfer in Cancer: A Comprehensive Review" International Journal of Molecular Sciences 22, no. 6: 3245. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms22063245

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop