Next Article in Journal
Potential of Salivary Biomarkers in Autism Research: A Systematic Review
Next Article in Special Issue
Influence of Serratia marcescens and Rhodococcus rhodnii on the Humoral Immunity of Rhodnius prolixus
Previous Article in Journal
Calmodulin as Ca2+-Dependent Interactor of FTO Dioxygenase
Previous Article in Special Issue
Bacterial Antigens Reduced the Inhibition Effect of Capsaicin on Cal 27 Oral Cancer Cell Proliferation
Review

The Lung Microbiome during Health and Disease

1
Department of Pathology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA
2
Department of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA
3
Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA
4
Mary H. Weiser Food Allergy Center, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Luis Vicente López-Llorca, Federico Lopez-Moya and Melpo Christofidou-Solomidou
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22(19), 10872; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms221910872
Received: 30 August 2021 / Revised: 24 September 2021 / Accepted: 28 September 2021 / Published: 8 October 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Host-Microbe Interaction 3.0)
Healthy human lungs have traditionally been considered to be a sterile organ. However, culture-independent molecular techniques have reported that large numbers of microbes coexist in the lung and airways. The lungs harbor diverse microbial composition that are undetected by previous approaches. Many studies have found significant differences in microbial composition between during health and respiratory disease. The lung microbiome is likely to not only influence susceptibility or causes of diseases but be affected by disease activities or responses to treatment. Although lung microbiome research has some limitations from study design to reporting, it can add further dimensionality to host-microbe interactions. Moreover, there is a possibility that extending understanding to the lung microbiome with new multiple omics approaches would be useful for developing both diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers for respiratory diseases in clinical settings. View Full-Text
Keywords: lung microbiome; host-microbe interactions; asthma; chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD); bronchiectasis; lung cancer; respiratory viral infections lung microbiome; host-microbe interactions; asthma; chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD); bronchiectasis; lung cancer; respiratory viral infections
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Yagi, K.; Huffnagle, G.B.; Lukacs, N.W.; Asai, N. The Lung Microbiome during Health and Disease. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22, 10872. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms221910872

AMA Style

Yagi K, Huffnagle GB, Lukacs NW, Asai N. The Lung Microbiome during Health and Disease. International Journal of Molecular Sciences. 2021; 22(19):10872. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms221910872

Chicago/Turabian Style

Yagi, Kazuma, Gary B. Huffnagle, Nicholas W. Lukacs, and Nobuhiro Asai. 2021. "The Lung Microbiome during Health and Disease" International Journal of Molecular Sciences 22, no. 19: 10872. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms221910872

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop