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Regulation of Cholesterol Metabolism by Bioactive Components of Soy Proteins: Novel Translational Evidence

1
Department of Soil, Plant and Food Sciences, University of Bari Aldo Moro, via Amendola 165/a, 70126 Bari, Italy
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Division of Internal Medicine Clinica Medica “A. Murri”, Department of Biomedical Sciences and Human Oncology, University of Bari Aldo Moro, 70124 Bari, Italy
3
Department of Medicine and Genetics, Division of Gastroenterology and Liver Diseases, Marion Bessin Liver Research Center, Einstein-Mount Sinai Diabetes Research Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY 10461, USA
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22(1), 227; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms22010227
Received: 9 December 2020 / Revised: 21 December 2020 / Accepted: 22 December 2020 / Published: 28 December 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Molecular Endocrinology and Metabolism)
Hypercholesterolemia represents one key pathophysiological factor predisposing to increasing risk of developing cardiovascular disease worldwide. Controlling plasma cholesterol levels and other metabolic risk factors is of paramount importance to prevent the overall burden of disease emerging from cardiovascular-disease-related morbidity and mortality. Dietary cholesterol undergoes micellization and absorption in the small intestine, transport via blood, and uptake in the liver. An important amount of cholesterol originates from hepatic synthesis, and is secreted by the liver into bile together with bile acids (BA) and phospholipids, with all forming micelles and vesicles. In clinical medicine, dietary recommendations play a key role together with pharmacological interventions to counteract the adverse effects of chronic hypercholesterolemia. Bioactive compounds may also be part of initial dietary plans. Specifically, soybean contains proteins and peptides with biological activity on plasma cholesterol levels and this property makes soy proteins a functional food. Here, we discuss how soy proteins modulate lipid metabolism and reduce plasma cholesterol concentrations in humans, with potential outcomes in improving metabolic- and dyslipidemia-related conditions. View Full-Text
Keywords: cholesterol; soybean; proteins; health; cardiovascular diseases cholesterol; soybean; proteins; health; cardiovascular diseases
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MDPI and ACS Style

Caponio, G.R.; Wang, D.Q.-H.; Di Ciaula, A.; De Angelis, M.; Portincasa, P. Regulation of Cholesterol Metabolism by Bioactive Components of Soy Proteins: Novel Translational Evidence. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22, 227. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms22010227

AMA Style

Caponio GR, Wang DQ-H, Di Ciaula A, De Angelis M, Portincasa P. Regulation of Cholesterol Metabolism by Bioactive Components of Soy Proteins: Novel Translational Evidence. International Journal of Molecular Sciences. 2021; 22(1):227. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms22010227

Chicago/Turabian Style

Caponio, Giusy R., David Q.-H. Wang, Agostino Di Ciaula, Maria De Angelis, and Piero Portincasa. 2021. "Regulation of Cholesterol Metabolism by Bioactive Components of Soy Proteins: Novel Translational Evidence" International Journal of Molecular Sciences 22, no. 1: 227. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms22010227

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