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Review

A Review of the Evidence for and against a Role for Mast Cells in Cutaneous Scarring and Fibrosis

1
Department of Pathology, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA
2
Centre for Dermatology Research, NIHR Manchester Biomedical Research Centre, Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Research, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PT, UK
3
MRC-SA Wound Healing Unit, Division of Dermatology, University of Cape Town, Observatory, Cape Town 7945, South Africa
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21(24), 9673; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21249673
Received: 1 October 2020 / Revised: 1 December 2020 / Accepted: 12 December 2020 / Published: 18 December 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mast Cells and Fibrosis )
Scars are generated in mature skin as a result of the normal repair process, but the replacement of normal tissue with scar tissue can lead to biomechanical and functional deficiencies in the skin as well as psychological and social issues for patients that negatively affect quality of life. Abnormal scars, such as hypertrophic scars and keloids, and cutaneous fibrosis that develops in diseases such as systemic sclerosis and graft-versus-host disease can be even more challenging for patients. There is a large body of literature suggesting that inflammation promotes the deposition of scar tissue by fibroblasts. Mast cells represent one inflammatory cell type in particular that has been implicated in skin scarring and fibrosis. Most published studies in this area support a pro-fibrotic role for mast cells in the skin, as many mast cell-derived mediators stimulate fibroblast activity and studies generally indicate higher numbers of mast cells and/or mast cell activation in scars and fibrotic skin. However, some studies in mast cell-deficient mice have suggested that these cells may not play a critical role in cutaneous scarring/fibrosis. Here, we will review the data for and against mast cells as key regulators of skin fibrosis and discuss scientific gaps in the field. View Full-Text
Keywords: mast cell; fibroblast; inflammation; hypertrophic scar; keloid; cutaneous fibrosis; scleroderma mast cell; fibroblast; inflammation; hypertrophic scar; keloid; cutaneous fibrosis; scleroderma
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MDPI and ACS Style

Wilgus, T.A.; Ud-Din, S.; Bayat, A. A Review of the Evidence for and against a Role for Mast Cells in Cutaneous Scarring and Fibrosis. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21, 9673. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21249673

AMA Style

Wilgus TA, Ud-Din S, Bayat A. A Review of the Evidence for and against a Role for Mast Cells in Cutaneous Scarring and Fibrosis. International Journal of Molecular Sciences. 2020; 21(24):9673. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21249673

Chicago/Turabian Style

Wilgus, Traci A., Sara Ud-Din, and Ardeshir Bayat. 2020. "A Review of the Evidence for and against a Role for Mast Cells in Cutaneous Scarring and Fibrosis" International Journal of Molecular Sciences 21, no. 24: 9673. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21249673

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