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Review

Total Recall: Lateral Habenula and Psychedelics in the Study of Depression and Comorbid Brain Disorders

1
Yale-NUS College, Singapore 637551, Singapore
2
Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology (IMCB), Singapore 637551, Singapore
3
Department of Physiology, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, NUS, Singapore 637551, Singapore
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21(18), 6525; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21186525
Received: 23 July 2020 / Revised: 24 August 2020 / Accepted: 4 September 2020 / Published: 7 September 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Molecular and Cellular Signaling on Antidepressant Mechanisms)
Depression impacts the lives and daily activities of millions globally. Research into the neurobiology of lateral habenula circuitry and the use of psychedelics for treating depressive states has emerged in the last decade as new directions to devise interventional strategies and therapies. Several clinical trials using deep brain stimulation of the habenula, or using ketamine, and psychedelics that target the serotonergic system such as psilocybin are also underway. The promising early results in these fields require cautious optimism as further evidence from experiments conducted in animal systems in ecologically relevant settings, and a larger number of human studies with improved spatiotemporal neuroimaging, accumulates. Designing optimal methods of intervention will also be aided by an improvement in our understanding of the common genetic and molecular factors underlying disorders comorbid with depression, as well as the characterization of psychedelic-induced changes at a molecular level. Advances in the use of cerebral organoids offers a new approach for rapid progress towards these goals. Here, we review developments in these fast-moving areas of research and discuss potential future directions. View Full-Text
Keywords: lateral habenula; psilocybin; depression; comorbid brain disorders; cerebral organoids lateral habenula; psilocybin; depression; comorbid brain disorders; cerebral organoids
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MDPI and ACS Style

Vitkauskas, M.; Mathuru, A.S. Total Recall: Lateral Habenula and Psychedelics in the Study of Depression and Comorbid Brain Disorders. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21, 6525. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21186525

AMA Style

Vitkauskas M, Mathuru AS. Total Recall: Lateral Habenula and Psychedelics in the Study of Depression and Comorbid Brain Disorders. International Journal of Molecular Sciences. 2020; 21(18):6525. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21186525

Chicago/Turabian Style

Vitkauskas, Matas, and Ajay S. Mathuru. 2020. "Total Recall: Lateral Habenula and Psychedelics in the Study of Depression and Comorbid Brain Disorders" International Journal of Molecular Sciences 21, no. 18: 6525. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21186525

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