Next Article in Journal
The Latest Findings of PD-1/PD-L1 Inhibitor Application in Gynecologic Cancers
Next Article in Special Issue
The COVID-19 Pandemic: Does Our Early Life Environment, Life Trajectory and Socioeconomic Status Determine Disease Susceptibility and Severity?
Previous Article in Journal
Transcriptome Analysis Provides Insights into Grain Filling in Foxtail Millet (Setaria italica L.)
Previous Article in Special Issue
Fetal Middle Cerebral Artery Pulsatility Index in No-Risk Pregnancies: Effects of Auditory Stimulation and Pregnancy Order
Review

Nutri-Epigenetics and Gut Microbiota: How Birth Care, Bonding and Breastfeeding Can Influence and Be Influenced?

1
Unit of Molecular Biology, School of Pharmacy, University of Camerino, 62032 Camerino, Italy
2
School of Medicine and Midwifery, Department of Neurology, Ophthalmology, Maternal and Childhood Sciences, Genoa University, Largo R. Benzi, 10-16132 Genova, Italy
3
Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine and Surgery, University of Malta, MSD2080 Msida, Malta
4
School of Nursing and Midwifery, Trinity College Dublin, 24 D’Olier Street, Dublin 2, Ireland
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21(14), 5032; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21145032
Received: 11 June 2020 / Revised: 7 July 2020 / Accepted: 14 July 2020 / Published: 16 July 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Epigenetic and Molecular Consequences of Early-Life Trauma)
Maternal lifestyle is an important factor in the programming of an infant’s epigenome, in particular when considered alongside the mode of birth and choice of feeding method (i.e., breastfeeding or formula feeding). Beginning in utero, and during the first two years of an infant’s life, cells acquire an epigenetic memory of the neonatal exposome which can be influential across the entire lifespan. Parental lifestyle (e.g., malnutrition, alcohol intake, smoke, stress, exposure to xenobiotics and/or drugs) can modify both the maternal and paternal epigenome, leading to epigenetic inheritance in their offspring. This review aims to outline the origin of early life modulation of the epigenome, and to share this fundamental concept with all the health care professionals involved in the development and provision of care during childbirth in order to inform future parents and clinicians of the importance of the this process and the key role it plays in the programming of a child’s health. View Full-Text
Keywords: nutri-epigenetics; gut microbiota; breastfeeding; birth care; best practice; parent education nutri-epigenetics; gut microbiota; breastfeeding; birth care; best practice; parent education
MDPI and ACS Style

Gabbianelli, R.; Bordoni, L.; Morano, S.; Calleja-Agius, J.; Lalor, J.G. Nutri-Epigenetics and Gut Microbiota: How Birth Care, Bonding and Breastfeeding Can Influence and Be Influenced? Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21, 5032. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21145032

AMA Style

Gabbianelli R, Bordoni L, Morano S, Calleja-Agius J, Lalor JG. Nutri-Epigenetics and Gut Microbiota: How Birth Care, Bonding and Breastfeeding Can Influence and Be Influenced? International Journal of Molecular Sciences. 2020; 21(14):5032. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21145032

Chicago/Turabian Style

Gabbianelli, Rosita, Laura Bordoni, Sandra Morano, Jean Calleja-Agius, and Joan G. Lalor. 2020. "Nutri-Epigenetics and Gut Microbiota: How Birth Care, Bonding and Breastfeeding Can Influence and Be Influenced?" International Journal of Molecular Sciences 21, no. 14: 5032. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21145032

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop