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Article

GeneLab Database Analyses Suggest Long-Term Impact of Space Radiation on the Cardiovascular System by the Activation of FYN Through Reactive Oxygen Species

1
WYLE Labs, NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field CA 94035, USA
2
Department of Physics, Hampton University, Hampton, VA 23668 USA
3
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA
4
Center for Radiological Research, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA
5
NASA Ames Research Center, Space Biosciences Division, Moffett Field, CA 94035, USA
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2019, 20(3), 661; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms20030661
Received: 15 January 2019 / Revised: 29 January 2019 / Accepted: 30 January 2019 / Published: 3 February 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Adaptation of Living Organisms in Space: From Mammals to Plants)
Space radiation has recently been considered a risk factor for astronauts’ cardiac health. As an example, for the case of how to query and identify datasets within NASA’s GeneLab database and demonstrate the database utility, we used an unbiased systems biology method for identifying key genes/drivers for the contribution of space radiation on the cardiovascular system. This knowledge can contribute to designing appropriate experiments targeting these specific pathways. Microarray data from cardiomyocytes of male C57BL/6 mice followed-up for 28 days after exposure to 900 mGy of 1 GeV proton or 150 mGy of 1 GeV/n 56Fe were compared to human endothelial cells (HUVECs) cultured for 7 days on the International Space Station (ISS). We observed common molecular pathways between simulated space radiation and HUVECs flown on the ISS. The analysis suggests FYN is the central driver/hub for the cardiovascular response to space radiation: the known oxidative stress induced immediately following radiation would only be transient and would upregulate FYN, which in turn would reduce reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, protecting the cardiovascular system. The transcriptomic signature of exposure to protons was also much closer to the spaceflight signature than 56Fe’s signature. To our knowledge, this is the first time GeneLab datasets were utilized to provide potential biological indications that the majority of ions on the ISS are protons, clearly illustrating the power of omics analysis. More generally, this work also demonstrates how to combine animal radiation studies done on the ground and spaceflight studies to evaluate human risk in space. View Full-Text
Keywords: space radiation; GeneLab; cardiovascular; HUVECs; FYN; ROS; reactive oxygen species; cardiomyocytes; protons; iron; HZE irradiation space radiation; GeneLab; cardiovascular; HUVECs; FYN; ROS; reactive oxygen species; cardiomyocytes; protons; iron; HZE irradiation
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MDPI and ACS Style

Beheshti, A.; McDonald, J.T.; Miller, J.; Grabham, P.; Costes, S.V. GeneLab Database Analyses Suggest Long-Term Impact of Space Radiation on the Cardiovascular System by the Activation of FYN Through Reactive Oxygen Species. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2019, 20, 661. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms20030661

AMA Style

Beheshti A, McDonald JT, Miller J, Grabham P, Costes SV. GeneLab Database Analyses Suggest Long-Term Impact of Space Radiation on the Cardiovascular System by the Activation of FYN Through Reactive Oxygen Species. International Journal of Molecular Sciences. 2019; 20(3):661. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms20030661

Chicago/Turabian Style

Beheshti, Afshin, J. Tyson McDonald, Jack Miller, Peter Grabham, and Sylvain V. Costes. 2019. "GeneLab Database Analyses Suggest Long-Term Impact of Space Radiation on the Cardiovascular System by the Activation of FYN Through Reactive Oxygen Species" International Journal of Molecular Sciences 20, no. 3: 661. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms20030661

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