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Open AccessArticle

Influence of Lytic Polysaccharide Monooxygenase Active Site Segments on Activity and Affinity

1
Biocatalysis and Biosensing Laboratory, Department of Food Science and Technology, BOKU—University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna, Muthgasse 18, 1190 Vienna, Austria
2
Institute of Molecular Modeling and Simulation, Department of Material Sciences and Process Engineering BOKU—University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna, Muthgasse 18, 1190 Vienna, Austria
3
Laboratory of Food Chemistry, Wageningen University & Research, Bornse Weilanden 9, 6708 WG Wageningen, The Netherlands
4
Department of Food, Environmental and Nutritional Sciences (DeFENS), Università degli Studi di Milano, Via Mangiagalli 25, 20133 Milano, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this work.
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2019, 20(24), 6219; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms20246219
Received: 7 November 2019 / Revised: 28 November 2019 / Accepted: 7 December 2019 / Published: 10 December 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Industrial Enzymes: Structure, Function and Applications)
In past years, new lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) have been discovered as distinct in their substrate specificity. Their unconventional, surface-exposed catalytic sites determine their enzymatic activities, while binding sites govern substrate recognition and regioselectivity. An additional factor influencing activity is the presence or absence of a family 1 carbohydrate binding module (CBM1) connected via a linker to the C-terminus of the LPMO. This study investigates the changes in activity induced by shortening the second active site segment (Seg2) or removing the CBM1 from Neurospora crassa LPMO9C. NcLPMO9C and generated variants have been tested on regenerated amorphous cellulose (RAC), carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) and xyloglucan (XG) using activity assays, conversion experiments and surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy. The absence of CBM1 reduced the binding affinity and activity of NcLPMO9C, but did not affect its regioselectivity. The linker was found important for the thermal stability of NcLPMO9C and the CBM1 is necessary for efficient binding to RAC. Wild-type NcLPMO9C exhibited the highest activity and strongest substrate binding. Shortening of Seg2 greatly reduced the activity on RAC and CMC and completely abolished the activity on XG. This demonstrates that Seg2 is indispensable for substrate recognition and the formation of productive enzyme-substrate complexes. View Full-Text
Keywords: enzyme engineering; lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase; phylogenetic analysis; regioselectivity; substrate binding; substrate specificity enzyme engineering; lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase; phylogenetic analysis; regioselectivity; substrate binding; substrate specificity
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Laurent, C.V.; Sun, P.; Scheiblbrandner, S.; Csarman, F.; Cannazza, P.; Frommhagen, M.; van Berkel, W.J.; Oostenbrink, C.; Kabel, M.A.; Ludwig, R. Influence of Lytic Polysaccharide Monooxygenase Active Site Segments on Activity and Affinity. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2019, 20, 6219.

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