Next Article in Journal
Maintenance of Type 2 Response by CXCR6-Deficient ILC2 in Papain-Induced Lung Inflammation
Next Article in Special Issue
Iron and Sphingolipids as Common Players of (Mal)Adaptation to Hypoxia in Pulmonary Diseases
Previous Article in Journal
Composition of the Reconstituted Cell Wall in Protoplast-Derived Cells of Daucus Is Affected by Phytosulfokine (PSK)
Previous Article in Special Issue
Intermittent Hypoxia-Hyperoxia Training Improves Cognitive Function and Decreases Circulating Biomarkers of Alzheimer’s Disease in Patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment: A Pilot Study
Article

Oxidative Stress Markers to Investigate the Effects of Hyperoxia in Anesthesia

1
Dipartimento di Scienze della Salute, Università degli Studi di Milano, 20142 Milan, Italy
2
SC Anestesia e Rianimazione, Ospedale San Paolo—Polo Universitario, ASST Santi Paolo e Carlo; 20142 Milan, Italy
3
Coordinated Research Center on Respiratory Failure, University of Milan, 20123 Milan, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2019, 20(21), 5492; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms20215492
Received: 25 September 2019 / Revised: 24 October 2019 / Accepted: 29 October 2019 / Published: 4 November 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Adaptation to Hypoxia: A Chimera?)
Oxygen (O2) is commonly used in clinical practice to prevent or treat hypoxia, but if used in excess (hyperoxia), it may act as toxic. O2 toxicity arises from the enhanced formation of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) that exceed the antioxidant defenses and generate oxidative stress. In this study, we aimed at assessing whether an elevated fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2) during and after general anesthesia may contribute to the unbalancing of the pro-oxidant/antioxidant equilibrium. We measured five oxidative stress biomarkers in blood samples from patients undergoing elective abdominal surgery, randomly assigned to FiO2 = 0.40 vs. 0.80: hydroperoxides, antioxidants, nitrates and nitrites (NOx), malondialdehyde (MDA), and glutathionyl hemoglobin (HbSSG). The MDA concentration was significantly higher 24 h after surgery, and the body antioxidant defense lower, in the FiO2 = 0.80 group with respect to both the FiO2 = 0.40 group and the baseline values (p ≤ 0.05, Student’s t-test). HbSSG in red blood cells was also higher in the FiO2 = 0.80 group at the end of the surgery. NOx was higher in the FiO2 = 0.80 group than the FiO2 = 0.40 group at t = 2 h after surgery. MDA, the main end product of the peroxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids directly influenced by FiO2, may represent the best marker to assess the pro-oxidant/antioxidant equilibrium after surgery. View Full-Text
Keywords: hyperoxia; oxygen; oxidative stress; malondialdehyde; glutathionyl hemoglobin; hypoxia; anesthesia; biomarkers; hydroperoxides; nitric oxide hyperoxia; oxygen; oxidative stress; malondialdehyde; glutathionyl hemoglobin; hypoxia; anesthesia; biomarkers; hydroperoxides; nitric oxide
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Ottolenghi, S.; Rubino, F.M.; Sabbatini, G.; Coppola, S.; Veronese, A.; Chiumello, D.; Paroni, R. Oxidative Stress Markers to Investigate the Effects of Hyperoxia in Anesthesia. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2019, 20, 5492. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms20215492

AMA Style

Ottolenghi S, Rubino FM, Sabbatini G, Coppola S, Veronese A, Chiumello D, Paroni R. Oxidative Stress Markers to Investigate the Effects of Hyperoxia in Anesthesia. International Journal of Molecular Sciences. 2019; 20(21):5492. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms20215492

Chicago/Turabian Style

Ottolenghi, Sara, Federico M. Rubino, Giovanni Sabbatini, Silvia Coppola, Alice Veronese, Davide Chiumello, and Rita Paroni. 2019. "Oxidative Stress Markers to Investigate the Effects of Hyperoxia in Anesthesia" International Journal of Molecular Sciences 20, no. 21: 5492. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms20215492

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop