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Derailed Ceramide Metabolism in Atopic Dermatitis (AD): A Causal Starting Point for a Personalized (Basic) Therapy

1
Institute of Precision Medicine, Medical and Life Sciences Faculty, Furtwangen University, Jakob-Kienzle-Strasse 17, 78054 Villingen-Schwenningen, Germany
2
EXIM Department, Fraunhofer Institute IZI Leipzig, Schillingallee 68, 18057 Rostock, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2019, 20(16), 3967; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms20163967
Received: 19 July 2019 / Revised: 8 August 2019 / Accepted: 9 August 2019 / Published: 15 August 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Inflammatory Skin Conditions 2019)
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Abstract

Active rebuilding, stabilizing, and maintaining the lipid barrier of the skin is an encouraging disease management and care concept for dry skin, atopic dermatitis (eczema, neurodermatitis), and psoriasis. For decades, corticosteroids have been the mainstay of topical therapy for atopic dermatitis; however, innovations within the scope of basic therapy are rare. In (extremely) dry, irritated, or inflammatory skin, as well as in lesions, an altered (sphingo)lipid profile is present. Recovery of a balanced (sphingo)lipid profile is a promising target for topical and personalized treatment and prophylaxis. New approaches for adults and small children are still lacking. With an ingenious combination of commonly used active ingredients, it is possible to restore and reinforce the dermal lipid barrier and maintain refractivity. Lysosomes and ceramide de novo synthesis play a key role in attenuation of the dermal lipid barrier. Linoleic acid in combination with amitriptyline in topical medication offers the possibility to relieve patients affected by dry and itchy skin, mild to moderate atopic dermatitis lesions, and eczemas without the commonly occurring serious adverse effects of topical corticosteroids or systemic antibody administration. View Full-Text
Keywords: atopic dermatitis; lysosomotropic compounds; apoptosis; lysosome; ceramide metabolism; amitriptyline; ceramide de novo synthesis; antioxidants; linoleic acid; sphingolipid profile atopic dermatitis; lysosomotropic compounds; apoptosis; lysosome; ceramide metabolism; amitriptyline; ceramide de novo synthesis; antioxidants; linoleic acid; sphingolipid profile
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Blaess, M.; Deigner, H.-P. Derailed Ceramide Metabolism in Atopic Dermatitis (AD): A Causal Starting Point for a Personalized (Basic) Therapy. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2019, 20, 3967.

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