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Open AccessReview

Recent Progress in the Regeneration of Spinal Cord Injuries by Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

1
Institute of Histology and Embryology, Faculty of Medicine, Comenius University, Sasinkova 4, 811 08 Bratislava, Slovakia
2
Department of Orthopaedics, Faculty of Medicine, Comenius University and National Institute of Children’s Diseases, Limbova 1, 833 40 Bratislava, Slovakia
3
Institute of Medical Biology, Genetics and Clinical Genetics, Faculty of Medicine, Comenius University, Sasinkova 4, 811 08 Bratislava, Slovakia
4
Regenmed Ltd., Medena 29, 811 01 Bratislava, Slovakia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2019, 20(15), 3838; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms20153838
Received: 5 June 2019 / Revised: 27 July 2019 / Accepted: 2 August 2019 / Published: 6 August 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Disease Modeling Using Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells 2.0)
Regeneration of injuries occurring in the central nervous system, particularly spinal cord injuries (SCIs), is extremely difficult. The complex pathological events following a SCI often restrict regeneration of nervous tissue at the injury site and frequently lead to irreversible loss of motor and sensory function. Neural stem/progenitor cells (NSCs/NPCs) possess neuroregenerative and neuroprotective features, and transplantation of such cells into the site of damaged tissue is a promising stem cell-based therapy for SCI. However, NSC/NPCs have mostly been induced from embryonic stem cells or fetal tissue, leading to ethical concerns. The pioneering work of Yamanaka and colleagues gave rise to the technology to induce pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from somatic cells, overcoming these ethical issues. The advent of iPSCs technology has meant significant progress in the therapy of neurodegenerative disease and nerve tissue damage. A number of published studies have described the successful differentiation of NSCs/NPCs from iPSCs and their subsequent engraftment into SCI animal models, followed by functional recovery of injury. The aim of this present review is to summarize various iPSC- NPCs differentiation methods, SCI modelling, and the current status of possible iPSC- NPCs- based therapy of SCI. View Full-Text
Keywords: spinal cord injuries; induced pluripotent stem cells; differentiation; regeneration; disease modeling spinal cord injuries; induced pluripotent stem cells; differentiation; regeneration; disease modeling
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MDPI and ACS Style

Csobonyeiova, M.; Polak, S.; Zamborsky, R.; Danisovic, L. Recent Progress in the Regeneration of Spinal Cord Injuries by Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2019, 20, 3838.

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