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Article

Endometrial Stromal Cells Circulate in the Bloodstream of Women with Endometriosis: A Pilot Study

1
Department of Reproductive Medicine, IVIRMA-Barcelona S.L., 08017 Barcelona, Spain
2
Group of Biomedical Research in Gynecology, Vall Hebron Research Institute (VHIR) and University Hospital, 08035 Barcelona, Spain
3
Center for Reproductive Sciences, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA
4
Igenomix Foundation, Paterna, 46980 Valencia, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2019, 20(15), 3740; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms20153740
Received: 11 June 2019 / Revised: 18 July 2019 / Accepted: 29 July 2019 / Published: 31 July 2019
Endometriosis is characterized by the presence of endometrial tissue outside the uterus. While endometriotic tissue is commonly localized in the pelvic cavity, it can also be found in distant sites, including the brain. The origin and pathophysiology of tissue migration is poorly understood; retrograde menstruation is thought to be the cause, although the presence of endometrium at distant sites is not explained by this hypothesis. To determine whether dissemination occurs via the bloodstream in women with endometriosis, we analyzed circulating blood for the presence of endometrial cells. Circulating endometrial stromal cells were identified only in women with endometriosis but not in controls, while endometrial epithelial cells were not identified in the circulation of either group. Our results support the hypothesis that endometrial stromal cells may migrate through circulation and promote the pathophysiology of endometriosis. The detection of these cells in circulation creates avenues for the development of less invasive diagnostic tools for the disease, and opens possibilities for further study of the origin of endometriosis. View Full-Text
Keywords: endometriosis; circulating endometrial cells; CD10; stromal cells; diagnostics; liquid biopsy endometriosis; circulating endometrial cells; CD10; stromal cells; diagnostics; liquid biopsy
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MDPI and ACS Style

Vallvé-Juanico, J.; López-Gil, C.; Ballesteros, A.; Santamaria, X. Endometrial Stromal Cells Circulate in the Bloodstream of Women with Endometriosis: A Pilot Study. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2019, 20, 3740. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms20153740

AMA Style

Vallvé-Juanico J, López-Gil C, Ballesteros A, Santamaria X. Endometrial Stromal Cells Circulate in the Bloodstream of Women with Endometriosis: A Pilot Study. International Journal of Molecular Sciences. 2019; 20(15):3740. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms20153740

Chicago/Turabian Style

Vallvé-Juanico, Júlia, Carlos López-Gil, Agustín Ballesteros, and Xavier Santamaria. 2019. "Endometrial Stromal Cells Circulate in the Bloodstream of Women with Endometriosis: A Pilot Study" International Journal of Molecular Sciences 20, no. 15: 3740. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms20153740

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